U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Co-Management

Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council

An example of conservation through co-management, the Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council (AMBCC) was formed in 2000 and consists of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, and representatives of Alaska's Native population.

The AMBCC's primary purpose is to conserve migratory birds through development of recommendations for the subsistence spring/summer harvest in Alaska. Subsistence regulations were first published in 2003.

2019 Spring/Summer Migratory Bird Subsistence Regulations

Please see the 2019 regulations booklet for specific region season date.

For a printed copy, contact Cheryl Graves with USFWS Migratory Bird Management at 907-786-3887

Contact Us:

AMBCC Office, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
1011 E. Tudor Road MS 201
Anchorage, AK 99503 
Telephone: (907) 786-3887

Email: cheryl_graves@fws.gov

Annual Open Period to Change Harvest Regulations: Nov. 1 - Dec. 15

    King Eider - male by Tim Bowman/USFWS
    King Eider by Tim Bowman/USFWS
    Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council Logo

    The logo of the Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council (AMBCC) incorporates the drawing of a Yup’ik mask by artist Katie Curtis from Toksook Bay, Alaska. Some people refer to this drawing as “The Goose Mask.” The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service commissioned this drawing in the late 1990s during the process of creating the AMBCC. An actual mask was not carved. The original drawing is black and white; the colors used here were added in 2009 when new outreach materials were produced for the AMBCC subsistence harvest survey. The choice of colors was based on historical and current Yup’ik artwork. Katie Curtis was consulted during this process and agreed with the use of the colors. The mask depicts a Canada goose surrounded by 8 feathers. The feathers represent the 8 steps to implement a legal, regulated spring subsistence bird hunt: 1) Notify people of the intent to form management bodies; 2) Meet to share ideas; 3) Send out ideas and listen; 4) Choose the form of management bodies; 5) Start rule-making; 6) Recommend rules for Alaska; 7) Link with management in other U.S. flyways; and 8) Link with the nation. Since its inception, this new regulatory framework has been designed to promote true collaboration among a diversity of stakeholders as cultures intermingle in the history of wildlife management and conservation in Alaska.

    Questions & Answers - Establishment of the 1st Legal Harvest Season

    Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council

      Calendar of Events and Transcripts

      Meeting Transcripts

      Next Statewide Council Meeting

      • September 2019 dates TBD
      • Unangam Ulaa Bldg.
        1131 E International Airport Road
        Anchorage

       

      Harvest Regulations:  

      New Regulation - Use of Inedible Bird Parts in Authentic Native Handicrafts for Sale (Effective Date: 8/23/17)

      Emperor Goose by Donna Dewhurst/USFWS
      Emperor Goose by Donna Dewhurst/USFWS

      Fact Sheet for Harvesters

      Management Plans:

      Press Releases - 2019