USFWS
Fire Management
Alaska Region   
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Because wildfires are a common occurrence in Alaska we plan for fire. On many refuges in Alaska, it's not a question of if there will be fire, but when. By planning, we are able to reduce the risks to life and property and use fire to maintain the health of ecosystems.

All fire management actions on Alaska refuges are based on Fire management Plans. These plans are aligned with the objectives of the Comprehensive Conservation Plans that guide management of each refuge and with the Alaska Interagency Wildland Fire Management Plan. Fire Management Plans provide direction to prepare for and respond to fires; for fire prevention and education efforts, for fire effects monitoring and research, and for hazardous fuels reduction.

Each refuge in Alaska maintains its own Fire Management Plan. Questions and comments about a refuge's plan should be directed to the refuge manager.

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (907) 456-0250

Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge (907) 456-0329

Kenai National Wildlife Refuge (907) 262-7021

Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge (907) 487-2600

Innoko/Koyukuk/Nowitna National Wildlife Refuges (907) 656-1231

Selawik National Wildlife Refuge (907) 442-3799

Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge (907) 883-5312

Togiak National Wildlife Refuge (907) 842-1063

Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge (907) 543-3151

Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge (907) 456-0440

Factsheets

On May 19th 2014 the Funny River fire started on the western side of Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. Over the next five days the fire grew to nearly 200,000 acres, burning four structures and two outbuildings.

 

 

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Last Updated: October 28, 2014