USFWS
Alaska Region
Conserving the Nature of America

Funding Opportunity

 

 

Social Science Research to Support the Implementation of a Visitor Use Management Strategy

The US Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 intends to award a single source financial assistance agreement as authorized by 505 DM 2.14 (B) to Clemson University Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. This notice is not a request for proposals and the Government does not intend to accept proposals.

Arctic Refuge seeks to obtain necessary human dimensions data to effectively plan for its polar bear viewing management strategy into the future, and to consider the need for establishing a visitor capacity and potentially limiting boat-based visitor use on the Refuge waters immediately surrounding Kaktovik. The planning effort is expected to continue through 2019, and result in an EA and preferred alternative for the continuation of a compatible polar bear viewing permitting program and management strategy with a 15-year planning horizon.

Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program

The Department of the Interior, through the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Subsistence Management (OSM) intends to issue a grant to ANSEP for a period not to exceed five years. Funds are not to be used for any other purpose other than academic scholarships.

Kenai National Wildlife Refuge

The US Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 intends to award a single source financial assistance agreement as authorized by 505 DM 2.14 (B) to the University of Alaska Fairbanks. This notice is not a request for proposals and the Government does not intend to accept proposals.

Biological staff (Dr. John Morton, Dr. Dawn Magness, Matt Bowser) at the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge (KENWR) have been cooperating with Dr. Diana Wolf at the University of Alaska Fairbanks on a study of the distribution of White, Lutz and Sitka spruce on the Kenai Peninsula before and after the spruce bark beetle outbreak that occurred in the late 1980s through 1990s. This study is critical for understanding why spruce bark beetles had such varying lethality on spruce forests. KENWR staff will collect new growth from branch shoots (apical meristem) in spring 2016 and 2017, keep them on dry ice, and send via overnight mail to Dr. Wolf’s lab. Following the methods of Hamilton and Aitken (2013), Dr, Wolf will extract DNA from all samples to estimate the degree of hybridization between White and Sitka spruce. Her lab will screen 24 microsatellite loci to determine which works best, and genotype all individuals with high quality DNA extractions with 1-12 microsatellite loci. In addition, her lab will sequence DNA at one mitochondrial locus and one chloroplast locus. The expected product from this collaborative effort will be a jointly-authored manuscript that will be submitted to a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

Yukon River Salmon Research and Management Assistance FY2017

A request for conceptual project proposals of one year in length addressing the needs of the priority Categories and Factors listed in the announcement. Applicants are strongly encouraged to develop projects that incorporate local capacity with members of Yukon River communities in which they may be working. Coordinating projects with state and federal regulatory agencies is also recommended, but not mandatory.

Finite Block Kriging with Detection Functions: Development of a new model for estimating the abundance of moose in Alaska by building on the Geospatial Population Estimator

The Geospatial Population Estimator (GSPE), also known as finite block kriging for plot-based sampling (Ver Hoef 2008), has been widely used in Alaska to estimate the abundance of moose. The method provided relatively unbiased and precise estimates of abundance when data were collected during recommended conditions, e.g., adequate snow cover (Kellie and Delong 2006). During the past five years, however, adequate snowfall has been unreliable throughout most of Alaska.

The objective of this funding opportunity is to develop a model that incorporates a detection function into the GSPE. The model will be used to predict moose abundance under a range of conditions known to affect the count of moose in western Alaska.

FY17 Sea Duck Joint Venture Science Program

The Sea Duck Joint Venture (SDJV) is a conservation partnership under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. Its mission is to promote the conservation of all North American sea ducks through partnerships by providing greater knowledge and understanding for effective management. The SDJV has evolved from a broad-based science program to a more focused program intended to provide information most needed by managers to make informed decisions about sea duck management and conservation. The program’s overall strategies and priorities are outlined in a strategic plan and an implementation plan and may be found at http://seaduckjv.org/.

Arctic Landscape Conservation Center (ALCC)

The US Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 intends to award a single source financial assistance agreement as authorized by 505 DM 2.14 (B) to the University of Alaska Fairbanks, International Arctic Research Center (IARC). This notice is not a request for proposals and the Government does not intend to accept proposals.

The Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (ALCC) is seeking to upgrade new hardware; update PostgreSQL, API and other software used by the database; and expand the ALCC’s new Terrestrial Environmental Observation Network (TEON) to make database robust and secure; and implement the decision support necessary with respect to hydroclimate data.

Support for the implementation of landscape conservation design through Alaska’s LCC’s

Alaska and Northwest Canada LCCs are seeking support for the implementation of landscape conservation design. This includes supporting stakeholder workshops; managing projects to assess current and future landscape condition and filling important science and information gaps; developing coordinated monitoring and evaluation; and communication.

National Wetlands Inventory

The US Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 intends to award a single source financial assistance agreement as authorized by 505 DM 2.14 (B) to St Mary’s University of Minnesota. This notice is not a request for proposals and the Government does not intend to accept proposals.

The National Wetlands Inventory program (NWI) within Fisheries and Ecological Services, announces the availability of approximately $250,000 to assist in development of baseline digital wetland data and surface hydrography for 3.2 million acres contained within the boundaries of the Selawik National Wildlife Refuge (Selawik NWR) over a 2.25 year time period. This funding will assist in the implementation of recently developed mapping techniques utilizing new technologies, image sources and integrated mapping techniques for the continued development of Alaska wetland maps that meet established national standards for a mapping scale of 1: 24,000 scale.

Modeling the effects of altered salmon phenologies on the landscape-level foraging opportunities of brown bears

The US Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 intends to award a single source financial assistance agreement as authorized by 505 DM 2.14 (B) to Oregon State University. This notice is not a request for proposals and the Government does not intend to accept proposals.

This financial assistance opportunity is being issued under the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit (CESU) Network: (http://www.cesu.psu.edu/materials/partners.htm). The CESU network provides research, technical assistance, and education to federal land management, environmental, and research agencies and their partners. The partners serve the biological, physical, social, cultural, and engineering disciplines needed to address natural and cultural resource management issues at multiple scales and in an ecosystem context.

The purpose of this agreement is to provide support and assistance to Oregon State University through a Post-Doctoral Research position to populate, refine, and enhance a simulation model Dr. Jonathon Armstrong has developed to evaluate how salmon management policies affect bears under different scenarios of climate change and human activity. This project builds upon pioneering collaborative research during 2012-2015 with Dr. Armstrong, Will Deacy, and William Leacock at Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge that has emphasized how the iconic bear populations of Kodiak and greater coastal Alaska require salmon runs that are abundant and spread across time in an unfragmented landscape. (Deacy, Will, W.B. Leacock, and J. Armstrong. In Press. Kodiak brown bears surf the red wave: direct evidence from GPS collared individuals. Ecology).

Greater Fairbanks Greenbelt Planning and Implementation Plan

A cooperative agreement between the Service and the Interior Alaska Land Trust (IALT) will provide assistance to the IALT’s conservation efforts in Fairbanks by funding a Project Coordinator responsible for identifying willing landowners with the Greater Fairbanks Greenbelt Planning and Implementation Project (Project), and for negotiating either conservation easements or fee simple title transfer of property to the IALT.

This award will continue funding the IALT’s Project Coordinator to contact and negotiate with landowners to obtain or maintain wildlife habitat corridors and trail continuity between parcels within both the Chena Flats and Goldstream Valley Greenbelts. This work would allow IALT to continue building a system of connected parcels for wildlife habitat corridors and public-use trail systems within the Greater Fairbanks Area

USFWS Natural Resource Program Center (NRPC) WRIA Program 2017

The US Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 intends to award a single source cooperative financial assistance agreement as authorized by 505 DM 2.14 (B) to University of Alaska Anchorage, Alaska Natural Heritage Program (AKNHP). This notice is not a request for proposals and the Government does not intend to accept proposals. This financial assistance opportunity is being issued under the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit (CESU) Network.

The Water Resources Branch of the National Wildlife Refuge System in Alaska announces the availability of approximately $40,000/annually to assist in data analysis, geospatial data collection, the continued construction of a Geospatial Information System (GIS) geodatabase and geospatial data mapping needs of Water Resource Inventory and Assessments over a six year period. This opportunity is a continuation of an existing cooperative agreement with the University of Alaska under the North and West Alaska CESU. The opportunity presents UAA and the USFWS a funding to jointly conduct technical water resource related analysis, geospatial data construction, and geospatial products for the continued management of water related habitats on the National Wildlife Refuge System in Alaska.

 

Community Training and Video Production for Walrus Haulout Public Education Video

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Region 7 intends to award a single source financial assistance agreement as authorized by 505 DM 2.14 (B) to Alaska Teen Media Institute (ATMI). This notice is not a request for proposals and the Government does not intend to accept proposals.

The community training and video production project will provide the opportunity for youth in the NVPL and the community at large to participate in this public education campaign effort, while receiving training and experience in video capture, video production and public communications.

 

East Asian - Australasian Flyway Partnership


The US Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 intends to award a single source financial assistance agreement as authorized by 505 DM 2.14 (B) to Partnership for the East Asian – Australasian Flyway. This notice is not a request for proposals and the Government does not intend to accept proposals. The primary purpose of this federal funding opportunity is to better enable the East Asian - Australasian Flyway Partnership Secretariat’s (herein known as EAAFP) goal of recognizing and conserving migratory water birds and their habitats in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway for the benefit of people and biodiversity.

Assessing abundance and migratory connectivity of boreal wetland birds on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska


To provide assistance in a study of wetland associated breeding landbirds and shorebirds of conservation concern (SOCC) in Anchorage, Alaska, including Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson (JBER). Applicants must be able to: 1) work with Audubon Alaska to recruit, train, and supervise citizen scientists to monitor wetlands in Anchorage parks and on JBER recreational lakes for use by declining wetland birds; 2) compile and summarize survey data collected by citizen scientists on the use of JBER recreational lakes and other wetlands; 3) recruit, train, and supervise university students to participate in Anchorage and JBER; 4) supervise students to compile JBER wetlands spatial data and work with USFWS biologists to develop spatial models of habitat use by wetland birds, which will be compared with data from Anchorage wetlands; 5) accomplish and coordinate data analysis, report writing, and manuscript preparation on wetland bird habitat use, trends, and annual movements with USFWS and JBER biologists.

Climate altered terrestrial carbon and nutrient flux to the aquatic foodweb from increased depth of soil ice thaw, Selawik and Fish Rivers


The purpose of this agreement is to provide support and assistance to Michigan Technological University to investigate the base of the Selawik River basin aquatic food-web, and link it to the anticipated increase in terrestrial inputs of carbon and nitrogen to the aquatic ecosystem as a result of climate change. This project builds on prior research conducted in 2011-2014 under the title of “Spatial and seasonal sub-surface entry of marine and/or estuarine water into coastal freshwater ecosystems, Selawik, Northwest Alaska.”

 

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To Apply Visit Grants.gov

 

 

Last updated: November 2016