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  • A birds-eye-view photograph of an inefficient rock dam.

    El Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre comienza la remoción de la Represa de Cambalache del Río Grande de Arecibo

    March 20, 2019 | 2 minute readArecibo, Puerto Rico — El Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre (Servicio) junto con el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico (PRDRNA) y otros colaboradores, iniciaron la remoción de la Represa de Cambalache, localizada en el Río Grande de Arecibo. La remoción de esta represa conectará y restaurará 25 kilómetros del Río Grande de Arecibo a unas condiciones de hábitat más naturales, proveyéndole así a los peces y otras especies acuáticas un hábitat más saludable con un flujo de agua libre. Read the full story...

    Represa Cambalache. Photo © William Hernández.

  • Shadow of a man fishing from a bank.

    Spring events at Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery

    March 20, 2019 | 3 minute readJamestown, Kentucky — Spring is in the air at Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery. We are excited to announce our upcoming events. Times for all events are Central. Calling all runners! April 13 is set for our fourth annual Trout Trot 5K trail run. Early registration (before March 28th) is $20, late registration is $25; kids 12 and under are free with a paid adult. Race day registration 8 – 8:45 a. Read the full story...

    A man fishing. Photo by Steve Corey, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

  • A birds-eye-view photograph of an inefficient rock dam.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service begins removal of Cambalache Dam to aid conservation of Río Grande de Arecibo

    March 20, 2019 | 2 minute readArecibo, Puerto Rico — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (the Service), along with the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (PRDNER) and other partners, today began the removal of the Cambalache Dam. The removal of the low-rise dam will connect and restore 25 kilometers of riverine habitat to a more natural state, as well as provide fish and other aquatic species with a healthier, free-flowing stream. It will also rid the river of a safety hazard, decrease erosion and boost recreational opportunities upstream of Arecibo. Read the full story...

    Represa Cambalache. Photo © William Hernández.

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.

    Unique fish gets endangered species protection with proposed exemptions and critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 6 minute readA small, colorful fish found in the Coosa River Basin is now federally protected. On January 29, 2018, the trispot darter was formally recognized as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now proposing exemptions to otherwise prohibited activities under the ESA. The exemptions, included in a 4(d) rule, mark the ESA’s flexibility in allowing for certain management activities to continue because of their overall benefit to the long-term status of the listed darter. Read the full story...

    Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

  • A light orange salamander with a bright orange stripe

    Conservation partnerships help keep two birds, salamander and skink from requiring endangered species act protections

    December 18, 2018 | 4 minute readFollowing rigorous scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that, thanks in part to ongoing conservation partnerships, four southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow, Florida sandhill crane, striped newt and Cedar Key mole skink do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. “Our efforts working closely with diverse partners to proactively understand and address threats to wildlife is succeeding,” said Leo Miranda, the Service’s Southeast regional director. Read the full story...

    Juvenile striped newt. Photo by FWC.

  • Ozark snail species presumed extinct following science-based surveys

    December 18, 2018 | 2 minute readFollowing rigorous, science-based surveys, the Ozark pyrg, a small snail native to Arkansas and Missouri, is presumed extinct, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. No Ozark pyrgs have been confirmed in surveys since their first discovery in 1915. As a result of today’s finding, the pyrg will not be listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The spiral-shaped Ozark pyrg was originally found more than 100 years ago in the White River near Cotter, Arkansas, and in the North Fork White River near Norfork, Arkansas, extending into Missouri. Read the full story...

  • A small, blue and yellow fish floating above rocky substrate

    Tiny freshwater fish does not warrant federal protection

    December 18, 2018 | 3 minute readAfter a thorough scientific review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that populations of the Tippecanoe darter, a small freshwater fish, do not warrant federal protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In some places, surveys suggest increasing populations, likely due to improvements in water quality. One of the smallest darters in the world, the Tippecanoe darter continues to be found across its historical range in larger streams and rivers of the Ohio River watershed in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia. Read the full story...

    Tippecanoe darter. Photo © Robert Criswell, used with permission.

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