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KOYUKUK/NOWITNA/INNOKO: NWR's Galena Science Camp Hits the Road
Alaska Region, November 28, 2016
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Louden Tribal Council student interns teach Galena Science Campers about National Elk Refuge as they visit a forest near Galena, Alaska.
Louden Tribal Council student interns teach Galena Science Campers about National Elk Refuge as they visit a forest near Galena, Alaska. - Photo Credit: Karin Bodony, USFWS
Galena Science Campers get a taste of Georgia's Okefenokee NWR while they visit an interior Alaska wetland. (Note: Since alligators are cold blooded it is safe to pet them in Alaska.)
Galena Science Campers get a taste of Georgia's Okefenokee NWR while they visit an interior Alaska wetland. (Note: Since alligators are cold blooded it is safe to pet them in Alaska.) - Photo Credit: Karin Bodony, USFWS

In August of 2016, 37 elementary students from Galena, Alaska, took an imaginary road trip across the Lower-48 states to learn about the National Wildlife Refuge system. During two sessions of the week-long Galena Science Camp the students “visited” refuges in each of five USFWS regions to learn about wildlife, habitat, management challenges and success stories. Real staff members from the far-away refuges got involved by sending brochures, information, and natural objects from their locations. Science camp students created scrapbooks of their journey to remind them of their experience of America’s vast National Wildlife Refuge System.
Galena Science Camp is a day-camp that is held entirely outdoors in the village of Galena. In 2016 students went on local field trips to learn about refuges in the Lower-48 and how they compare to Alaska. They learned a lot about the important roles these refuges play in restoring endangered species and providing critical habitat in areas that have far greater human impacts than we find in rural Alaska. Experiences at the main camp and field trips provided ample opportunities for directed learning and learning through play. Conservation work opportunities were provided to Louden Tribal Council youth interns who assist daily with the Science Camp.
In most years Galena Science Camp focuses on habitats, wildlife, ecological concepts and management approaches that pertain to our home in interior Alaska. This year campers gained a valuable broader perspective of the role of refuges throughout the United States. Many of them were able to make connections to places they have visited or know about, and were inspired to learn more about wildlife conservation across our nation.


Contact Info: Karin Bodony Karin Bodony, (907) 656-1231, karin_bodony@fws.gov
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