Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
Bats as Superheroes
Midwest Region, April 21, 2016
Print Friendly Version
One of our student bat superheroes for the day.
One of our student bat superheroes for the day. - Photo Credit: USFWS
An Ecological Services staff member discusses bat kryptonite (aka white-nose syndrome).
An Ecological Services staff member discusses bat kryptonite (aka white-nose syndrome). - Photo Credit: USFWS
Ecological Services staff and students locate a tagged
Ecological Services staff and students locate a tagged "bat." - Photo Credit: USFWS

Staff of Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge and the Marion Illinois Ecological Services Sub-Office joined forces to educate nearly 400 local 4th and 5th grade students about Bat Superheroes for Earth Day.

At this point you may be questioning whether bats are really superheroes and if so, let us be the first to tell you that bats are indeed superheroes! As we explained to the students, bats protect our communities by reducing the abundance of pesky mosquitoes and protect our food supply by reducing pests that would eat or damage our crops. We explained how our Bat Superheroes have superpowers (i.e. adaptations) such as the ability of true flight and a super specialized navigational tool called echolocation! They use these powers to help protect us and themselves. In addition, we discussed how, similar to Superman, bats are susceptible to a form of kryptonite (White-Nose Syndrome) that weakens them, can lead to death, and is a major concern in bat populations in the United States and Canada.

We then asked the students how they could help our Bat Superheroes survive and continue to protect our communities. One student quickly responded that we could be a Bat Superhero’s sidekick like Robin is to Batman. “Exactly!” we exclaimed and continued to describe how we can help our Bat Superheroes by being bat advocates, installing a bat house in our backyard, and protecting our caves and forested habitats. We concluded our discussion by showing the students how as biologists we use radio telemetry to locate and protect sensitive bat habitat. We also provided the teachers with information on bat superpowers, white-nose syndrome, and additional bat-related education materials. Overall, it was successful Earth Day event and provided a great opportunity to spread awareness of our Bat Superheroes!

http://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/index.html
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Crab_Orchard/


Contact Info: Matthew Mangan, 618-997-3344 ext 345, matthew_mangan@fws.gov
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer