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Ecological Services Partners with Refuges to Monitor Bats!
Midwest Region, July 1, 2015
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Female Indiana bat captured at Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge
Female Indiana bat captured at Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge - Photo Credit: USFWS
Male Indiana bat captured at Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge
Male Indiana bat captured at Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge - Photo Credit: USFWS
Ecological Services and Refuge staff training for bat monitoring
Ecological Services and Refuge staff training for bat monitoring - Photo Credit: USFWS

Have you ever wondered what happens when Ecological Services and Refuges join forces? Great things of course! This past summer the Rock Island, Marion and Columbia Ecological Services Field Offices partnered with Refuges in Illinois, Iowa and Missouri to monitor bat populations across five National Wildlife Refuges. The monitoring included mist net and acoustic surveys and was focused on documenting species presence, population status and habitat use on each of the refuges. The results were nothing short of impressive.

Six species of bats were documented at Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge, including the first confirmed federally endangered Indiana bat individuals and Indiana bat maternity colony. Monitoring at Cypress Creek refuge resulted in the capture of eight species of bats and re-confirmed the presence of two Indiana bat maternity colonies that included more than 200 and 400 individuals respectively. At Mingo National Wildlife Refuge, six species of bats were captured including a federally threatened northern long-eared bat and several Indiana bats. In addition, the first confirmed Indiana bat maternity colony was documented that was comprised of approximately 100 individuals. Six species of bats were also captured at Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge, including the first confirmed northern long-eared and Indiana bat individuals and first confirmed Indiana bat maternity colony. Finally, four species of bats were captured on the Savanna District of the Upper Mississippi refuge including a northern long eared bat and an impressive 84 little brown bats which is a species under review by the Service.

These efforts highlight the importance of Refuges for threatened and endangered bat species and highlight the need for continued collaboration between Ecological Services and Refuges to conserve, manage, and restore habitats for these unique resources. Ecological Services is looking to strengthen the partnership with Refuges in the upcoming years through additional monitoring efforts and will continue to promote conservation and restoration of listed species and their ecosystems.

http://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/index.html
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Crab_Orchard/
http://www.fws.gov/Refuge/Cypress_Creek/
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Mingo/
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/port_louisa/
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Upper_Mississippi_River/Savanna_District.html


Contact Info: Matthew Mangan, 618-997-3344 ext 345, matthew_mangan@fws.gov
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