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Urban coastal habitat created for monarchs and other pollinators in chicago
Midwest Region, October 13, 2017
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A sign posted at Montrose Point alerting the public to the new pollinator garden installed by the Chicago Park District through the Service's Great Lakes Coastal Program/Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.
A sign posted at Montrose Point alerting the public to the new pollinator garden installed by the Chicago Park District through the Service's Great Lakes Coastal Program/Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. - Photo Credit: Mike Redmer US Fish and Wildlife Service
Along with other native grasses and wildflowers to provide nectar for pollinators, a special emphasis was placed on planting milkweeds (foreground) at Montrose Point to attract and benefit monarch butterflies.
Along with other native grasses and wildflowers to provide nectar for pollinators, a special emphasis was placed on planting milkweeds (foreground) at Montrose Point to attract and benefit monarch butterflies. - Photo Credit: Mike Redmer US Fish and Wildlife Service

Work is being completed on the creation of 1.5 acres of pollinator habitat within parkland at the Chicago Park District’s Montrose Point. The project was funded in 2015 as a cost-share with the Chicago Park District through the Service’s Great Lakes Coastal Program, along with the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. Montrose Point is adjacent to Montrose Beach, which, with more than 1.2 million annual users, is the most visited beach in the State of Illinois. Montrose Point is well known for being an extremely important resting area for songbirds that cross or fly along the coastline of Lake Michigan during their migration, and the Chicago Park District has partnered with the Service in the past to help plan habitat enhancements at Montrose Point. For this project however, they created habitat by replacing approximately 1.5 acres of mowed turfgrass with native prairie grasses and wildflowers to attract pollinators, such as the monarch butterfly. Signs are already in place to assist with interpreting the noteworthy changes for the many beach and park users who will pass this new urban habitat.

The Great Lakes Coastal Program recently highlighted Urban Opportunity areas in its five-year strategic plan. The Montrose Point Butterfly Garden highlights the types of initiatives and able partnerships that can be developed around greenspace in urban areas.


Contact Info: Michael Redmer, 847-381-2253, Mike_Redmer@fws.gov
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