Endangered Species
Ecological Services

Partnership Stories Archived: 2013

The Ecological Services Program works formally and informally with a large variety of groups and individuals to further species conservation. Partnerships for protecting and recovering endangered and threatened species have been established between the Endangered Species Program and other U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service programs, other federal agencies, state governments, private landowners, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and American Indian tribes.



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Posted
11/25/13

40 Years of Endangered Species in the National Wildlife Refuge System (6:02)

Partner: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Servcice National Wildife Refuge System

Black-capped vireo. Credit: USFWS
Description: Congress passed and President Richard M. Nixon signed the Endangered Species Act in December 1973. National wildlife refuges are home to more than 280 of the nation's 1,311 endangered or threatened species.

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Posted
09/20/13

Saving the Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle (2:18)

Partner: Texas Parks and Wildlife

Kemp's ridley sea turtle. Credit: Jereme Phillips, USFWS
Status: Endangered/ Listed on December 2, 1970
Scientific Name: Lepidochelys kempii

Description: The Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle is making a comeback from the brink of extinction. Get a close-up look at turtle nesting and watch as the hatchlings crawl into the surf.
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Posted
09/16/13

How We Brought the Condor Back From the Brink (14:58)

Partner: San Diego Safari Park

California condor. Credit: USFWS
Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Gymnogyps californianus

Description: There were just 22 California condors left in the world in 1987 – all of them in captivity – a species on the brink of extinction. At TEDxDeExtinction, Michael Mace explains the remarkable efforts that have been made to save them and restore a wild population.
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Posted
08/16/13

Chinese Researchers Work to Save Pandas (4:17)

Partner: Peoples Republic of China

Giant panda. Credit: Connie Bransilver
Status: Endangered/ Listed on January 23, 1984
Scientific Name: Ailuropoda melanoleuca

Description: People working at the Chengdu Research Base in China committed themselves to raising awareness about and saving the endangered species by studying and promoting giant panda breeding.
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Posted
08/12/13

By the Numbers: Saving the Florida Panther (2:18)

Partner: The Nature Conservancy

Florida panther. Credit: Connie Bransilver
Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1970
Scientific Name: Eubalaena glacialis

Description: Florida panthers are one of the most endangered animals on the planet. The Nature Conservancy is working with partners to buy critical lands, bringing hope for the future of these majestic animals.
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Posted
08/06/13

Anesthetizing Right Whales (2:33)

Partners: Florida Museum of Natural History and University of Florida

right whale
Status: Endangered/ Listed on June 2, 1970
Scientific Name: Eubalaena glacialis

Description:Explore Research at the University of Florida: Mike Walsh, a clinical associate professor of veterinary medicine, explains that in the wild, right whales can pick up hundreds of feet of fishing line, which fills their mouths, causing them to starve to death over time. Right whales avoid human contact, so removing the line is difficult. UF applied its methods of anesthetizing dolphins to the whales, and has been successful in removing line from the whales' mouths.
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Posted
07/17/13

North Atlantic Right Whale: Stay 500 Yards Away! (0:32)

Partner: National Marine Fisheries Service

right whale
Status: Endangered/ Listed on June 2, 1970
Scientific Name: Eubalaena glacialis

Description: A 60 second public service announcement reminds boaters in Florida and Georgia that endangered right whales share the same waters and need your cooperation to survive.
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Posted
07/10/13

Sierra Bighorn Translocation (3:34)

Partner: California Department of Fish and Wildlife

bighorn sheep
Status: Endangered/ Listed on April 20, 1999
Scientific Name: Ovis canadensis sierrae

Description: Once abundant throughout California's alpine areas, the population of Sierra Nevada bighorn has dwindled to just two herds by the 1970s.
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Posted
06/26/13

Veterinarians Repair An Endangered Florida Panther's Broken Leg (2:35)

Partners: Florida Wildlife Commission, University of Florida and White Oak Conservation Center

Florida panther
Status: Endangered/ Listed on July 5, 1979
Scientific Name: Puma concolor coryi

Description: A nine-month old female Florida panther was brought to the University of Florida Small Animal Hospital by FWC veterinarians to repair a broken leg. The panther was hit by a car in Collier County in May and was recovering at White Oak Conservation Center when the animal re-injured her leg.
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Posted
06/12/13

Nihoa Millerbird Translocation Project (28:31)

Partners: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, State of Hawaii, and American Bird Conservancy

Nihoa millerbird
Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Acrocephalus familiaris kingi

Description: In a historic and collaborative effort to save a species from extinction, 50 critically endangered Nihoa Millerbirds have been released on Laysan Island in Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument since 2011. The return of the species to the remote Hawaiian island is the result of many years of research and detailed planning by biologists and resource managers, led by a partnership between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and American Bird Conservancy.
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Posted
06/05/13

Endangered Oregon Spotted Frog (2:58)

Partners: Canadian Wildlife Service, The Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces and Vancouver Aquarium

Oregon spotted frog
Status: Candidate/ Conservation to preclude ESA listing protection
Scientific Name: Rana pretiosa

Description: Conservation efforts are being undertaken in Canada to support the recovery of the Oregon spotted frog in its only population center in British Columbia.
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Posted
05/29/13

Panther Project: How We Collar a Florida Panther (5:58)

Partners: Florida Fish and Wildlife Comission

Florida panther
Status: Endangered/ Listed on July 5, 1979
Scientific Name: Puma concolor coryi

Description: Using ATVs or buggies, dogs with tracking devices, short wave radio communication and determination, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Panther Project Team divides and sets out to catch and collar a Florida panther.
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Posted
05/20/13

Byron Jorjorian and the Tennessee Coneflower (06:28)

Partners: Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

Tennessee purple coneflower
Status: Delisted due to recovery/ Originally listed on July 5, 1979
Scientific Name: Echinacea tennesseensis

Description: A cedar glade is unique habitat in the southeast, a natural opening in the forest caused by bedrock pushing its way to the surface. With shallow soil and lots of limestone, a cedar glade can be a tough place to live. But that hasn't stopped a flower that bears the name of the state from calling it home.
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Posted
05/06/13

Breeding Hellbenders in Tennessee (04:28)

Partners: Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Nashville Zoo, Middle Tennessee State University, Lee University, U.S. Forest Service, University of Tennessee, and others

Eastern hellbender

Description: The Eastern and Ozark hellbenders, and their close cousins the Japanese and Chinese giant salamanders, have remained unchanged since 60 million years ago during the age of the dinosaurs. Both subspecies have experienced recent population declines, and may be threatened with extinction unless conservation programs are developed.
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Posted
05/01/13

Texas Blind Salamander in the Edwards Aquifer (6:12)

Partners: U.S. Fish and Widlife Service / Southwest Region, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department, Edwards Aquifer Authority, and others

Texas blind salamander

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Typhlomolge rathbuni

Description: The Texas blind salamander was one of the first species ever listed for endangered species protection. It is very rare, and dwells underwater in caves near San Marcos. It is called the blind salamander as it has no eyes, just two black dots under its skin. Water pollution and habitat degradation are the reasons for its decline.
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Posted
04/08/13

Ozark Hellbender Conservation (10:21)

Partners: Saint Louis Zoo, Missouri Department of Conservation

Ozark hellbender

Status: Endangered/ Listed on November 7, 2011
Scientific Name: Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi

Description: A Missouri resident, the Ozark hellbender is the largest species of salamander native to North America. These salamanders are perfectly adapted to their stream habitats with their flattened head and body, short stout legs, long rudder-like tail, and very small, beady eyes. The hellbender populations have been threatened by stream impoundments, pollution and siltation for years, yet seemed to do okay in Missouri and Arkansas.
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Posted
04/04/13

Monitoring for the Endangered Houston Toad in Texas (5:35)

Partners: FEMA, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Houston toad

Status: Endangered/ Listed on October 13, 1970
Scientific Name: Bufo houstonensis

Description: A short video detailing the project in Bastrop County to monitor for the endangered Houston toad amid survivor recovery operations following the historic wildfires of 2011.
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Posted
04/02/13

Long Beach West Cottage Removal and Habitat Restoration (2:17)

Partners: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Trust for Public Land, Connecticut Audubon Society, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, The Nature Conservancy, the Town of Stratford, and others.

Piping plover

Status: Threatened/ Listed on December 11, 1985
Scientific Name: Charadrius melodus

Description: Thirty-seven cottages and multiple other structures were removed from a 35-acre stretch of barrier beach in Stratford, Conn. The area now provides habitat for many animal species, including the federally threatened piping plover.
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Posted
03/08/13

Achieving Balance: Anacapa Island 10 Years After Rat Removal (15:07)

Partners: Channel Islands National Park, Island Conservation, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration

Channel Islands National Park

Description: Ten years after removing nonnative rats the ecosystem on Anacapa Island, including rare seabirds, is showing profound results of recovery.
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Posted
03/06/13

Introduction to Manatees (9:38)

Partner: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

West Indian manatee

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Trichechus manatus

Description: Video resource for people who may observe for manatees during permitted in-water activities to help prevent animal injury or death. The video includes facts about manatees and manatee presence in Florida waterways, and describes how to identify manatees in the water.
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Posted
03/01/13

Little Things, Big Problems: Invasive Plants in Our Parks (6:46)

Partners: National Park Service

Pitcher's thistle

Status: Threatened/ Listed on July 18, 1988
Scientific Name: Cercium pitcheri

Description: This video describes some of the problems faced by native plants and animals due to the spread of non-native and invasive species. Many endangered and threatened species are affected by invasive species, primarily through the alteration or loss of habitat they can cause.
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Posted
02/26/13

Tennessee River Mussels (1:53)

Buttons

Description: A short video about historical and current uses of freshwater mussel shells in the button and cultured pearl industry.

Before the advent of plastics in the 1930s, most buttons were made from freshwater mussels. Today, freshwater mussels are collected in several areas of the U.S. and their shells are sold to Asian/Pacific markets. Their shells are used to make small round beads that are placed in marine oysters and serve as the nuclei for cultured pearls. The mussels harvested for this purpose are not federally protected,and the fishery is regulated.

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Posted
02/13/13

Nature Report: Rare Ocelot 2013 (1:54)

Partners: Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Ocelot

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 28, 1972
Scientific Name: Leopardus pardalis

Description: The ocelot is one of the most critically endangered species in the United States. This three part video series follows biologists as they work to save this secretive cat.
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Posted
02/4/13

Saving Endangered Birds Along Arkansas River (1:39)

Partners: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Interior least tern

Status: Endangered/ Listed on May 28, 1985
Common Name: Interior least tern Scientific Name: Sterna antillarum

Description: Lewis and Clark's frequently observed least terns along the Missouri River during their 1804 expedition. In the past century, the number of Least Terns has fluctuated widely. During the late 1800s, Least Terns declined in numbers due to harvesting for the millinery trade. After the Migratory Bird Treaty Act was passed in 1916 to make commercial harvest illegal, tern numbers increased until the mid-1900s when alterations to hydrologic patterns, and urban and industrial development of shorelines led to further population declines.
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Last updated: January 16, 2018