Yreka Fish and Wildlife Office
Pacific Southwest Region
HeaderImage

Description of PacifiCorp’s Klamath Hydroelectric Project Facilities Within the Klamath Hydroelectric Project:

Link River

 

PacifiCorp’s Eastside and Westside Powerhouses receive water diverted into canals on each side of the Klamath River at the Bureau of Reclamation’s Link River Dam.  Link River Dam is located 253.7 river miles up the Klamath River from its mouth (RM), at the lower end of Upper Klamath Lake. This facility already has a state-of-the-art fish ladder suitable for trout, suckers, and anadromous fish migrations.

USFWS Photo of Link River Dam

USFWS photo of Link River Dam.  Spillway and fish ladder are on the far left and the Eastside hydropower bay on the right side foreground.  The reef is upstream of the dam.  The two channels that were blasted through the reef are located on each side of the reef near the shoreline.

 


USBOR Photo of Link River Dam and fish ladder

USBOR photo of Link River Dam and fish ladder.

 

 Keno Dam

 

The Link River flows into Lake Ewauna, which is the upper end of an impounded reach of the Klamath River (also known as Keno Reservoir), which is controlled by Keno Dam. 

 

Lake Ewauna/Keno Reservoir looking downstream from River Mile (RM) 251. Photo from USGS

Lake Ewauna/Keno Reservoir looking downstream from RM 251.  Photo from USGS.

 

Keno Dam is at River Mile (RM) 233, approximately 20 miles downstream from Link River Dam.  There is no power generation at this dam.  This facility has a fish ladder suitable for trout and salmon passage.


Keno Dam with Keno Reservoir above and Klamath River below. Photo from R. Smith, ODFW

Keno Dam with Keno Reservoir above and Klamath River below.  Photo from Roger Smith, ODFW.

Keno Dam and downstram of Keno Dam. Photo from R. Smith, ODFW

Keno Dam and downstream of Keno Dam.  Photo from Roger Smith, ODFW.

 

J.C. Boyle Development

 

Below Keno Dam, the 4.7-mile long Keno Reach flows into J.C. Boyle Reservoir (also known as Topsy Reservoir), created by J.C. Boyle Dam.  J.C. Boyle Dam is at RM 224.7.  Here most of the flow is diverted out of the river through a canal around the four-mile J.C. Boyle Bypassed River Reach. The canal extends to the J.C. Boyle Powerhouse at RM 220.4.  Below the powerhouse, the 17-mile J.C. Boyle Peaking Reach of the Klamath River receives a daily peaking regime.  This facility has an outdated fish ladder and outdated fish screens that do not meet current National Marine Fisheries Service fish passage criteria.

 

USFWS Photo of J. C. Boyle Dam and fish ladder

USFWS photo of J. C. Boyle Dam and fish ladder

 


J. C. Boyle Dam Spillway and Ladder.  USFWS photo

J. C. Boyle Dam Spillway and Ladder.  USFWS photo.

J. C. Boyle Dam Diversion.  USFWS photo

J. C. Boyle Dam Diversion.  USFWS photo.

 

J. C. Boyle Dam Diversion Canal and Klamath River.  USFWS photo

J. C. Boyle Dam Diversion Canal and Klamath River.  USFWS photo.

 

Copco 1 and Copco 2 Dams

 

Near RM 209, the Klamath River crosses into California, and enters Copco Reservoir near RM 204.  Copco Reservoir is impounded by Copco No.1 Dam at RM 198.7, where flow is diverted into the adjacent Copco No. 1 Powerhouse.  About one-half mile below this powerhouse, Copco No. 2 Dam diverts almost the entire flow from Copco No. 2 Reservoir into a penstock (a very large pipe directing flow to a turbine) around the 1.4-mile Copco Bypassed River Reach to Copco No. 2 Powerhouse at RM 196.8.  Copco 1 and Copco 2 dams have no upstream or downstream fishways.

 

Copco Reservoir.  USFWS photo

Copco Reservoir.  USFWS photo

 

Copco No. 1 Dam.  USFWS photo

Copco No. 1 Dam.  USFWS photo

Copco No. 1 Powerhouse.  USFWS photo

Copco No. 1 Powerhouse. USFWS photo

 


Copco No. 2 Reservoir and Dam.  USFWS photo

Copco No. 2 Reservoir and Dam. USFWS photo

Copco No. 2 Powerhouse.  USFWS photo

Copco No. 2 Powerhouse.  USFWS photo

 

Iron Gate Dam

 

Below Copco 2 Powerhouse, the river flows into Iron Gate Reservoir, impounded by Iron Gate Dam at RM 190. This is the furthest downstream of the Project facilities. Here the flow passes through the Iron Gate Powerhouse, and then the Klamath River continues for 190 miles to the Pacific Ocean.  Iron Gate Dam has no upstream or downstream fishways.

 

Iron Gate Reservoir and Dam.  USFWS photo

Iron Gate Reservoir and Dam.  USFWS photo

Iron Gate Powerhouse.  USFWS photo

Iron Gate Powerhouse.  USFWS photo

 

Fall Creek Development

 

The Fall Creek development is the smallest in terms of generation, the oldest, and the only development not on the mainstem Klamath River.  Flow from Spring Creek (in the Jenny Creek watershed) is diverted into Fall Creek in Oregon, and these waters flow through the Fall Creek Powerhouse about one mile above Fall Creek’s juncture with the upper end of Iron Gate Reservoir.

 

Fall Creek Powerhouse.  USFWS photo

Fall Creek Powerhouse. USFWS photo