Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge
Southeast Region
Map of the Southeast Region Map of Kentucky Map of the Caribbean and Navassa Map of North Carolina Map of Tennessee Map of South Carolina Map of Arkansas Map of Louisiana Map of Mississippi Map of Alabama Map of Georgia Map of Florida

Landbirds

Credit: USFWS

Credit: USFWS

The tremendous variety of habitat types found on Wheeler NWR supports an amazing diversity of landbirds. Many species of concern identified in various landscape-level bird conservation plans are found in Complex habitats in all or a significant portion of their migration, nesting, and/or wintering seasons. Landbird abundance is dependent on habitat condition, weather, distribution, and amount of food and water.

 

Forest Birds

Despite being highly fragmented, hardwood forests of the Tennesse River basin play an important role in providing habitat and migration, food sources, for migratory and nesting forest birds.

Credit: USFWS

Credit: USFWS

Despite being highly fragmented, hardwood forests of the Tennesse River basin play an important role in providing habitat and migration, food sources, for migratory and nesting forest birds.

Forest bird species of concern found on Wheeler NWR include cerulean warbler, worm-eating warbler, wood thrush, Kentucky warbler, Louisiana waterthrush, whip-poor-will, yellow-throated vireo, Acadian flycatcher, American woodcock, chimney swift, eastern wood-pewee, yellow-billed cuckoo, blue-gray gnatcatcher, great crested flycatcher, and sharp-shinned hawk.

Riparian zone species of concern include Swainson’s warbler, prothonotary warbler, belted kingfisher, and green heron. Early-successional forest species of concern include blue-winged warbler, prairie warbler, field sparrow, white-eyed vireo, yellow-breasted chat, brown thrasher, and eastern towhee.

 

Shrub-Scrub Birds

Shrub-scrub, or early successional associated birds are another group of bird species that are considered vulnerable. Shrub-scrub habitat is limited on Wheeler NWR; however good opportunities may exist to increase acreage by establishing edges around agricultural fields.

Shrub-scrub bird species of concern found on Wheeler NWR include prairie warbler, field sparrow, yellow-breasted chat, brown thrasher, northern bobwhite, and eastern towhee.

 

Credit: USFWS

Credit: USFWS

Grassland Birds

Habitat loss is widely recognized as the primary reason that several grassland-dependent bird species have experienced major population declines.

Grassland bird species of concern found on Wheeler NWR include grasshopper sparrow, dickcissel, and eastern meadowlark.

 

Last updated: June 9, 2009