The Anadromous Fish Restoration Program

Managed Projects

Cow Creek Clear Creek Bear Creek Battle Creek Mill Creek Big Chico Creek Paynes Creek Antelope Creek Elder Creek Thomes Creek Stony Creek Paynes Creek Antelope Creek Deer Creek Upper Mainstem Sacramento River Lower Sacramento River Butte Creek Feather River Yuba River American River Cosumnes River Mokelumne River Calaveres River Stanislaus River Tuolomne River Merced River San Joaquin River Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta
Fiscal Year: 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 - 2005 - 2006 - 2007 - 2008 - 2009 - 2010
Development Process

The AFRP does not solicit proposals through a formal Request For Proposal process. Instead, the AFRP works closely with local watershed groups and encourages partners to develop project ideas with the AFRP Habitat Restoration Coordinator (HRC) assigned to their watershed. The HRC is the person who will present a project idea to AFRP management and (if the project is subsequently funded) who will act as the project manager. Potential partners are thus encouraged to work with the appropriate HRC and their local watershed group to discuss a project concept before preparing their proposals. Projects can be considered for funding throughout the Federal Fiscal Year (which begins October 1), but the following information provides guidance on process and general timing to best insure that partners develop projects within a time frame consistent with the AFRP Annual Work Plan planning horizon.

Project Selection

Prior to Fiscal Year 2001, the Anadromous Fish Restoration Program (AFRP) did not solicit proposals through a formal process. Starting in FY 2001, the AFRP is functionally integrated with the CALFED Bay-Delta Program (CBDP) agencies (the California Department of Fish and Game, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries) through the California Bay-Delta Authority (CBDA) in the CALFED Ecosystem Restoration Program proposal solicitation processes (CALFED PSP).

The AFRP will continue to work closely with local watershed groups and encourage partners to develop project ideas with the AFRP Habitat Restoration Coordinator (HRC) assigned to their watershed. Potential partners are encouraged to work with the appropriate HRC and their local watershed group to discuss a project concept before preparing their proposals. Habitat Restoration Coordinators work with partners (local watershed groups, counties, universities, and other non-profit groups) to develop project ideas that either specifically address priorities described in the CALFED PSP priorities for the Ecosystem Restoration Program or that focus on actions or evaluations identified in the AFRP Final Restoration Plan. Project ideas can be developed at any time of the year, but for a given fiscal year, the project partner should be prepared to submit a proposal before the annual CALFED PSP process deadlines.

For the AFRP, potential AFRP project proponents should submit their proposals in response to the CALFED PSP. It is important to review the proposal submittal process carefully. As part of this functional integration, potential future CALFED and AFRP and other CVPIA projects will undergo concurrent scientific and technical review to ensure that the best and highest priority projects are implemented and to ensure the most efficient use of funds.

During years when the AFRP fiscal budget year is in alignment with the CALFED PSP, the AFRP will consider funding program-appropriate projects solicited through the CALFED PSP. AFRP will then select and fund specific projects associated with the AFRP priority project list found in the most recent AFRP Annual Work Plan (AWP) (completed in September of most years).

During years when the AFRP fiscal budget year is not in alignment with the CALFED PSP, the AFRP selects projects from the most recent AFRP AWP's prioritized project list. The proposed AFRP projects are then developed into formal project proposals following the CALFED PSP proposal preparation guidelines and format. These projects will then be submitted to the CBDP for formal peer reviews. After emerging from the CBDP peer review process, the projects are then considered for funding by priority and by AFRP funding availability.

Other CVPIA programs are also participating in this process.

During the CALFED PSP review process, the HRCs and AFRP managers expect to participate in the geographic or regional review panels. Soon after the proposal solicitation closes, AFRP staff will sort through the proposals to identify those proposals that are aligned with AFRP restoration plan objectives and would be appropriate for AFRP or whether the proposed project would be more appropriately funded through a program conducted by another section of the CVPIA. Immediately after identifying the proposals appropriate for AFRP funding and concurrent with the scientific and technical review step in the CALFED PSP, the HRCs and AFRP managers will provide an AFRP staff assessment of each program-appropriate proposal's relevance to AFRP priorities and AFRP planning and implementation documents and strategies, based on the AFRP considerations for selecting projects.

Development Steps

The typical AFRP project usually proceeds in six steps:

1) Habitat Restoration Coordinators (HRCs) work with partners to develop projects:

HRCs work with local watershed groups and other potential partners to develop initial projects or project ideas to be included and prioritized in the Annual Work Plans (see documents section) for upcoming fiscal years or that focus on actions or evaluations identified in the 1997 Revised Draft Restoration Plan.. Project ideas can be developed at any time of the year, but for a given fiscal year, the HRC should have an initial proposal in hand by the end of September.

2) HRCs propose projects for funding by the AFRP:

The HRCs bring initial projects or project ideas forward for discussion with the AFRP managers and the HRCs from other geographic regions within the Central Valley. The focus of this discussion is to identify the highest priority projects for implementation in the coming fiscal year. This occurs from April through June preceding the new fiscal year.

3) HRCs and AFRP managers develop initial draft Annual Work Plan:

The HRCs and AFRP managers develop the initial draft Annual Work Plan (AWP), wherein new projects or project ideas are identified for funding in that fiscal year. Prioritized new projects or project ideas become part of the draft AWP. This step typically occurs during the July through August period.

4) Draft AWP shared with habitat restoration project implementing agencies:

The HRCs and AFRP managers then present the prioritized projects in the draft AWP and release to habitat restoration project implementing agencies. This step in the process generally occurs in September.

5) Draft AWP released to the public for comment:

The AFRP managers then release the Draft AWP to the public for their review and comment. This release is accompanied by a public presentation attended by the Restoration Fund Roundtable (a group of stakeholders with an interest in the expenditure of dollars from the Central Valley Project Restoration Fund) and the CALFED Integration Panel. The draft AWP is revised to address comments received from the public.

6) AWP implementation starts with onset of Federal fiscal year:

With the start of the Federal fiscal year, the HRCs continue to work with partners to complete the final scope which must include a detailed project budget. This information provides the foundation for the grant or cooperative or interagency agreement between the AFRP and the project partner.

In addition to this AWP-focused process, HRCs continually work with local watershed groups and other potential partners to identify new projects that are consistent with the Revised Draft Restoration Plan and other local watershed plans for funding consideration in subsequent fiscal years. AFRP staff also work with the Restoration Coordinator for the CALFED Bay-Delta Program to coordinate AFRP restoration planning activities with those of the CALFED Bay-Delta Program.

Proposals submitted to other funding programs that have goals consistent with those of the AFRP will also be considered by the AFRP for funding. These proposals may need to be modified to meet the CALFED Ecosystem Restoration Program PSP content requirements. Habitat Restoration Coordinators will also help direct partners toward additional potential cost-share contributors.

Partners who receive AFRP funding are responsible for providing the AFRP project manager with periodic Project Status Reports. AFRP proposal and project reporting formats are similar to those used by the CALFED Ecosystem Restoration Program to minimize duplication of effort for partners who receive funding from both the AFRP and CALFED's Ecosystem Restoration Program.

Selection Considerations

The considerations for selecting projects to develop and fund by the AFRP are based on the strategies in the Revised Draft Restoration Plan. The strategies in the Restoration Plan were developed to guide implementation of all sections of the CVPIA that contribute to making all reasonable efforts to at least double natural production of anadromous fish. All of these sections are considered separate programs by Interior and each receives it's own budget allocation. Over the last several years, the AFRP has been allocated about three to five million dollars. The Report to Congress: Six-Year Plan and Budget for Implementing the Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Fiscal Years 1999-2004 (dated June 1999), indicates that the AFRP will be allocated about seven million dollars in each of the next three fiscal years. The considerations listed below will be used to help guide investment of funds allocated to the AFRP.

These considerations listed here include those considerations listed in Table 2 of the Six-Year Plan and Budget (also appears as Table 1 in Attachment G-2 to the CALFED 2001 Proposal Solicitation Package). The considerations in the Six-Year Plan and Budget were developed to assist in ranking specific projects within any program conducted under the CVPIA, and not all of these apply to the AFRP, as defined by the budget allocated to the AFRP by Interior.

Additional AFRP considerations are found under Program Strategy, Implementation Principles and Implementation Approach.

Other implementation considerations important in assessing projects are:

Previous AFRP project investment
Technical feasibility
Timely implementation
Legal, regulatory, or technical issues