Rio Grande by A. Molles

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Books
Special thanks to Rio Grande Restoration for compiling the majority of this book list

Acequia Culture, Jose A. Rivera (UNM Press) - Examines the historic and contemporary significance of Acequia communities

Cadillac Desert, Mark Reisner (Penguin Books) - "The definitive work on the West's water crisis" (Newsweek)

Great River, Paul Horgan (Texas Monthly Press) - The history of the Rio Grande

In the Service of the Wild, Stephanie Mills (Beacon Press) - About grassroots efforts to help restore and heal the natural world

Pillar of Sand, Sandra Postel (WW Norton) - Examines global water limits and irrigation challenges

Rio del Norte, Carroll L. Riley (Univ. of Utah Press) - History of the Pueblo cultures of the Upper Rio Grande

Searching Out the Headwaters, Bates et al (Island Press) - Context and history of western water issues

The Upper Rio Grande: A Guide to Decision Making, S. Shupe and J. Folk-Williams (Western Network)

Western Water Law Made Simple, Marston et al (Island Press)

 

Scientific Literature

Auble, G. T., J. M. Friedman, et al. 1994. "Relating Riparian Vegetation to Present and Future Streamflows." Ecological Applications 4(3): 544-554.

deBuys, W. 2001. "Navigating the river of our future: The Rio Poco-Grande." Natural Resources Journal 41(2): 265-281.

Baird, D. C. 2001. Downstream Effects of Dams on the Middle Rio Grande. New Mexican Decision-Makers Field Guide No. 1: Water, Watersheds, and Land Use in New Mexico - Impacts of Population Growth on Natural Resources, Santa Fe Region. P. S. Johnson. Socorro, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources: 106-107.

Baird, D. C. 2001. Santa Ana River Rehabilitation Project Along the Middle Rio Grande. New Mexican Decision-Makers Field Guide No. 1: Water, Watersheds, and Land Use in New Mexico - Impacts of Population Growth on Natural Resources, Santa Fe Region. P. S. Johnson. Socorro, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources: 108-109.

Cleverly, J. E., C. N. Dahm, J. R. Thibault, D. J. Gilroy, and J. E. Allred Coonrod. 2002. Seasonal estimates of actual evapotranspiration from Tamarix ramosissima using 3-dimensional eddy covariance. Journal of Arid Environments. (pdf 708 KB)

Dahm, C. N., J. R. Cleverly, J. E. Allred Coonrod, J. R. Thibault, D. E. McDonnell, and D. J. Gilroy. 2002. Evapotranspiration at the land/water interface in a semi-arid drainage basin. Freshwater Biology 47(4): 831-844.

Dahm, C. N., K. W. Cummins, et al. 1995. "An Ecosystem View of the Restoration of the Kissimmee River." Restoration Ecology 3(3): 225-238.

Eichorst, K. D., M. C. Stuever, D. C. Shaw, and C. C. Crawford. 2001. Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program (BEMP): First Report: 1997-2000. Albuquerque, University of New Mexico: 43.

Ellis, L. M., M. C. Molles, et al. 1999. "Influence of experimental flooding on litter dynamics in a Rio Grande riparian forest ; New Mexico." Restoration Ecology 7(2): 193-204.

Ellis, L. M. C. S. Crawford, and M. C. Molles. 2002. The Role of the Flood Pulse in Ecosystem-Level Processes in Southwestern Riparian Forests: A Case Study from the Middle Rio Grande. Pages 51-107 in B. A. Middleton (ed.), Flood Pulsing in Wetlands: Restorting the Natural Hydrological Balance, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Ellis, L. M. (2001). "Short-term response of woody plants to fire in a Rio Grande riparian forest ; Central New Mexico ; USA." Biological Conservation 97(2): 159-170.

Ellis, L. M., C. S. Crawford, et al. 1998. "Comparison of litter dynamics in native and exotic riparian vegetation along the Middle Rio Grande of central New Mexico ; USA." Journal of Arid Environments 38(2): 283-296.

Ellis, L. M., C. S. Crawford, et al. 2001. "Influence of annual flooding on terrestrial arthropod assemblages of a Rio Grande riparian forest." Regulated Rivers-Research & Management 17(1): 1-20.

Gregory, S. V., F. J. Swanson, et al. 1991. "An Ecosystem Perspective of Riparian Zones." Bioscience 41(8): 540-551.

Milford, E. and E. Muldavin. 2001. River Bars of the Middle Rio Grande: Progress Report Year III. New Mexico Natural Heritage Program, Biology Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 12 p. (pdf 362 KB)

Milford, E., S. Wood, E. Muldavin, B. Jenkins, and K. Wild. 2000. River Bars of the Middle Rio Grande: Progress Report Year II. New Mexico Natural Heritage Program, Biology Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 30 p. (pdf 3.6 MB)

Molles, M. C., C. S. Crawford, et al. 1998. "Managed flooding for riparian ecosystem restoration : Managed flooding reorganizes riparian forest ecosystems along the middle Rio Grande in New Mexico." Bioscience 48(9): 749-756.

Sparks, R. E. 1995. "Need For Ecosystem Management of Large Rivers and Their Floodplains." Bioscience 45(3): 168-182.

Stanford, J. A. and G. C. Poole. 1996. "A protocol for ecosystem management." Ecological Applications 6(3): 741-744.

Stanford, J. A., J. V. Ward, et al. 1996. "A general protocol for restoration of regulated rivers." Regulated Rivers-Research & Management 12(4-5): 391-413.

Stromberg, J. C. 2001. "Restoration of riparian vegetation in the south-western United States: importance of flow regimes and fluvial dynamism." Journal of Arid Environments 49(1): 17-34.

Taylor, J. P. and K. C. McDaniel. 1998. "Restoration of saltcedar (Tamarix sp.)-infested floodplains on the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge." Weed Technology 12(2): 345-352.

Whitney, J. C. 1998. "Observations on Southwestern Ecosystems." New Mexico Journal of Science 38(November 1998): 233-251.

WRRI bibliography of technical reports on ground water in New Mexico


Reports

Draft Recovery Plan Southwester Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus), April 2001, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Recovery Team Technical Subgroup, Albuquerque, NM, 499 p. (pdf) This document is currently being finalized by the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Recovery Team Technical Subgroup, following closure of the public comment period on the draft plan.

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the Rio Grande Habitat Restoration Project, Los Lunas, New Mexico, March 2002 (pdf 11.5 MB)

The Green Paper: a Water Plan for the Future

Middle Rio Grande Ecosystem: Bosque Biological Management Plan, 1993, U.S. Fiish and Wildlife Service, Biological Interagency Team, Albuquerque, NM, 312 p. (pdf 191 MB)

Middle Rio Grande Ecosystem: Bosque Biological Management Plan Recommendations

Middle Rio Grande Water Budget, Averages for 1972-1999, Middle Rio Grande Water Assembly, Inc., October 1999.

Navigating the River of Our Future: The Rio Poco-Grande, The University of New Mexico School of Law, Natural Resources Journal, Spring 2001, Vol. 41, No. 2

New Mexico Decision-Makers Field Guide No. 1: Water, Watersheds, and Land Use in New Mexico - Impacts of Population Growth on Natural Resources, Santa Fe Region, 2001, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro.

Proposed Rule to Designate Critical Habitat for the Rio Grande Silvery Minnow, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, and Draft Economic Analysis (zip 5.1 MB)

The Rio Grande Compact (1939) (pdf 163 KB)

Rio Grande Silvery Minnow (Hybognathus amarus) Recovery Plan, 1999, U.S. Fish and Wildllife Service, Albuquerque, NM, 141 p.

The State of the Environment, 2001, New Mexico Environment Department, 64 p.

Water Issues in New Mexico and the Middle Rio Grande, UNM Institute for Public Policy, Summer 2000 (pdf 101 KB)

Newsletters

New Mexico State Engineer Office's Water Line

New Mexico Water Dialogue (call 505-421-2856 to order a subscription)

Rio Grande Restoration's River Song
(call 505-266-3609 to be added to the mailing list)

WRRI's Divining Rod


Fact Sheets

Dams and Diversions of the Middle Rio Grande (Bullard and Wells 1992, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Operations Fact Sheets)

Cottonwood (by Dr. James Cleverly)

Salt Cedar (by Dr. James Cleverly)

Seedballs: a New Tool for Revegetation (Adobe Seedball Consortium)


MRGBI Conference

2002 Conference Agenda
(pdf 38 KB)

Grants & Other Assistance for Riverine Corridor Restoration in New Mexico

Agency
Program Name
Purpose
Support Type
Eligibility
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Albuquerque District Office) Planning Assistance (Section 22) to States To develop plans for the development, utilization, and conservation of water and related land resources.
Financial assistance up to $500,000. 50% match required.
State, county, local, and tribal governments.
Support for Others Program To provide technical support for projects including those related to environmental protection and restoration.
Technical assistance on a paid contractual basis.
State, county, local, and tribal governments; federal agencies
Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Program
To restore, improve, and protect aquatic habitat for plants, fish, and wildlife.
Financial and technical assistance up to $5 million. 35% match required. State, county, local, and tribal governments; nonprofit conservation organizations
Natural Resources Conservation Service Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP) To undertake emergency measures, including the purchase of flood plain easements, for runoff retardation and soil erosion prevention to safeguard lives and property from floods, drought, and the products of erosion on any watershed whenever fire, flood or any other natural occurrence is causing or has caused a sudden impairment of the watershed.
Financial assistance of up to 100% of the restoration costs. Owners, managers, and users of public, private, or tribal lands that have been affected by a natural disaster.
Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) To provide technical and financial assistance to address soil, water, and related natural resource concerns in an environmentally beneficial manner. Farmers and ranchers.
Resource Conservation and Development (RC&D) To accelerate the conservation, development and utilization of natural resources, improve the general level of economic activity, and to enhance the environment and standard of living in designated RC&D areas. Helps applicants obtain financial assistance.
State, tribal and local units of government and local nonprofit organizations in rural areas.
Soil and Water Conservation Assistance (SWCA) To provide cost share and incentive payments to voluntarily address threats to soil, water, and related natural resources, including grazing land, wetlands, and wildlife habitat.
Financial assistance. 25% match required. Landowners who wish to make changes to cropping systems, grazing management, nutrient management, and irrigation. Land may not be a part of CRP, EQIP, or WRP priority areas.
Wetlands Reserve Program To achieve the greatest wetland functions and values, along with optimum wildlife habitat, on every acre enrolled in the program. USDA will pay up to 100% of restoration cost for permanent easments and 75% of 30-year easements or restoration-cost share agreements. Landowners wishing to establish long-term habitat conservation and wildlife practices and protection.
Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP) To develop and improve fish and wildlife habitat primarily on private land. Technical assistance and up to 75 percent cost-share assistance. All private landowners not currently enrolled in the Water Bank Program, CRP, WRP, or EWP.
Conservation Technical Assistance (CTA) For planning and implementing conservation practices that address natural resource issues. Technical assistance. Land-users, communities, units of state and local government, and other federal agencies in planning and implementing conservation systems.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Partners for Fish and Wildlife To restore wetlands, stream and river corridors, and other fish and wildlife habitats important for Federal trust species (threatened and endangered species, anadromous fish, and some marine mammals) ; to develop partnerships to implement these habitat restoration projects; to demonstrate applied technology for habitat restoration projects to help the public understand and participate in fish and wildlife resource conservation.
Financial assistance up to $25,000 (which may be exceeded in certain circumstances). Cost-share percentage varies. In-kind donations may be considered cost-sharing. Private landowners, schools, farmers and ranchers, Native American Nations, state and local agencies, municipalities.
U.S. Forest Service Collaborative Forest Restoration Program To reduce wildfire threats, restore ecosystems, reduce non-native tree proliferation, reestablish historic forest regimes, promote reforestation, preserve large and old trees, increase utilization of small diameter trees, and the creation of forest-related local employment. The fund was established by the Community Forest Restoration Act of 2000 (Title VI, Public Law 106-393) and limits projects to four years. The act also requires collaborative project review and selection, joint monitoring and evaluation, and reporting. Grant applications are due May 1, 2002. The act authorizes up to $5 million annually. Individual grants must not exceed $360,000 in Forest Service funding over four years, and not more than $120,000 in any one year. The applicant must share a minimum of 20% of the total costs of the project. Eligible applicants include local and tribal governments, educational institutions, landowners, conservation organizations, and other interested public and private entities.
National Fish and Wildlife Federation General Challenge Grant Challenge grants are awarded to projects that address priority actions promoting fish and wildlife conservation and the habitats on which they depend; work proactively to involve other conservation and community interests;
leverage available funding; and evaluate project outcomes. Project proposals are received on a year-round, revolving basis with two decision cycles per year (Pre-proposals due June 1 and October 15 and full proposals are due July 15 and December 1).
Grants typically range from $10,000-$150,000, based upon need. Funded projects ideally have a 2:1 cost-share ratio ($2 non-federal for every $1 of challenge grant funding). Federal, tribal, state, and local governments, educational institutions, and non-profit conservation organizations.
Bring Back the Natives (BBN) Supports on-the-ground habitat restoration projects that benefit native aquatic species (e.g., native fish, aquatic insects, mollusks, and amphibians) in their historic range. BBN projects generally involve riparian habitat restoration, moving streams towards stability, and supporting native aquatic communities. BBN will not fund basic research or monitoring. BBN will fund projects occurring between January 1, 2003, and September 30, 2004. Full proposal due date: July 15, 2002.
Award must be matched with an equal or greater amount of grantee funds; that is, a minimum ratio of 1:1 is required, but a ratio of 2:1 or higher is preferable. Encourages projects incorporating multiple federal, tribal, state, and local governments; corporations; private landowners; communities; and/or non-profit groups that directly benefit fish, wildlife, and other biotic resources on federal land or land that directly affects federal land and programs.

Centennial Refuge Legacy Supports projects that work to enhance the fish, wildlife, and plant habitats of the National Wildlife Refuge system country-wide, allowing the refuge to serve its wildlife and human constituents for the next 100 years; reach beyond the physical boundaries of the refuges themselves to engage people in the work of the refuge through partnerships, new collaborations, and alliances; work to enhance compatible wildlife-dependent recreation to include: hunting, fishing, wildlife photography and observation, and environmental education and interpretation. Full proposal due August 1, 2002.
$939,000 are available. Grant awards should not exceed $100,000. 50% cost-share required.
National Wildlife Refuges and their partners. Applicant must be a federal, state, or regional conservation agency, or a 501c(3) organization.
Five-Star Restoration Challenge Grants Provides modest financial assistance on a competitive basis to support community-based wetland, riparian, and coastal habitat restoration projects that build diverse partnerships and foster local natural resource stewardship through education, outreach, and training activities. Projects must include a strong on-the-ground wetland, riparian, or coastal habitat restoration component and should also include education, outreach, and community stewardship components. Projects involving only research, monitoring or planning are not eligible for funding. Full proposal due March 1, 2002.
Awards are between $5,000 and $20,000; the average grant is $10,000. Schools or youth organizations;
local or tribal governments;
local businesses or corporations;
conservation organizations or local citizens groups; state and federal resource management agencies; and
foundations or other funders.
Migratory Bird Conservancy (MBC) The MBC is a bird conservation grant fund supported by donations from birding businesses and their customers, and matched by National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. The MBC will fund projects that directly address conservation of priority bird habitats in the Western Hemisphere. Acquisition, restoration, and improved management of habitats are program priorities. Education, research, and monitoring will be considered only as components of actual habitat conservation projects. Deadline for preproposals is June 1, 2002. Full proposals are due July 15, 2002.
Award must be matched with an equal or greater amount of grantee funds; that is, a minimum ratio of 1:1 is required, but a ratio of 2:1 or higher is preferable.
National Wildlife Support Group Grant Supports projects that assist organizations to be effective co-stewards of our Nation’s important natural resources within the National Wildlife Refuge System. This program provides competitive seed grants to creative and innovative (start-up, capacity-building, or project specific) proposals that seek to increase the number and effectiveness of organizations interested in assisting the refuge system nationwide. Proposals are due by September 2, 2002. $1,500 - $5,000 Non-profit organizations or organizations that have applied for non-profit status, including "Friends" groups, Cooperative and Interpretive Associations, Audubon Chapters and other citizen support organizations interested in assisting a refuge or group of refuges and the refuge system as a whole.
Native Plant Conservation Initiative (NPCI) Supports on-the-ground conservation projects that protect, enhance, and/or restore native plant communities on public and private land. Projects typically fall into one of three categories and may contain elements of each: protection and restoration, information and education, and inventory and assessment. Applicants are encouraged, when appropriate, to include a pollinator component in their project. NPCI will fund projects occurring between November 1, 2002, and September 30, 2004.
Award must be matched with an equal or greater amount of grantee funds; that is, a minimum ratio of 1:1 is required, but a ratio of 2:1 or higher is preferable. Encourages projects incorporating multiple federal, tribal, state, and local governments; corporations; private landowners; communities; and/or non-profit groups that directly benefit fish, wildlife, and other biotic resources on federal land or land that directly affects federal land and programs.

NRCS: Conservation on Private Land The highest priority is placed on innovative projects that integrate conservation practices in ongoing agriculture, ranching and forestry operations. We will also seek projects that link our effort to larger NRCS programs such as the Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP), the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), and the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). Project proponents must clearly define the conservation problem they are seeking to address and explain how their project will provide measurable benefits for fish and wildlife. Proposals are due May 17, 2001.

The Foundation has received $3 million from the NRCS in support of this part-nership. Award must be match-ed with an equal or greater amount of grantee funds; that is, a min-imum ratio of 1:1 is required, but a ratio of 2:1 or higher is pre-ferable.
Partnership with the Army Corps of Engineers To foster cooperation on projects of mutual interest (between the NFWF and the Army Corps of Engineers), such as fish and wildlife habitat restoration, non-structural flood control opportunities, wetlands restoration, and endangered species protection. Full proposal due July 15, 2001. The Foundation can partner with local sponsors by awarding grants and by assisting in the local sponsor's fund-raising efforts to meet the Corps' requirements.
Pathways to Nature Conservation Fund Offers grants to enhance environmental education activities and bird and wildlife viewing opportunities at significant nature tourism destinations in the United States and Canada. Projects of interest include, but are not limited to, boardwalks, viewing platforms and blinds, educational displays, and interactive exhibits. Deadlines for submissions are July 15 and December 1, 2002. Approximately $100,000 is available. Grant requests should not exceed $50,000. Minimum 1:1 ratio of third party cash or contributed goods and services.
Pulling Together Initative (PTI) To prevent, manage, or eradicate invasive and noxious plants through a coordinated program of public/private partnerships; and to increase public awareness of the adverse impacts of invasive and noxious plants. PTI will fund projects occurring between March 1, 2003, and September 30, 2004. Apply by November 6, 2002.
Award must be matched with an equal or greater amount of grantee funds; that is, a minimum ratio of 1:1 is required, but a ratio of 2:1 or higher is preferable. Encourages projects incorporating multiple federal, tribal, state, and local governments; corporations; private landowners; communities; and/or non-profit groups that directly benefit fish, wildlife, and other biotic resources on federal land or land that directly affects federal land and programs.
The Turner Foundation Water and Toxics To strengthen the advocacy, outreach and technical capabilities of organizations addressing the protection of water systems; to stop the further degradation of water-dependent habitats from new dams, diversions and other large infrastructure projects; to reduce wasteful water use via conservation; to promote allocation of water specifically for environmental purposes, including habitat restoration and fish and wildlife protection; to support efforts to improve public policies affecting water protection, including initiatives to secure pollution prevention and habitat protection; to reduce pesticide use; to strengthen the advocacy, outreach and technical capabilities of organizations addressing the disproportionate use and locating of toxic materials in poor and rural areas. The Foundation awards both general support and project-specific grants. See The Foundation website for limitations. Grant proposals are reviewed four times per year. See The Foundation website for proposal review dates and deadlnes.
Fiancial assistance. No cost sharing required. 501(c)3 organizations or projects with a 501(c)3 fiscal sponsor are eligible. Although The Foundation considers programs that are both national and international in scope, state and local programs are also considered. Priority consideration is given to programs in New Mexico, Montana, Colorado, Nebraska, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.
Habitat To support ecosystem-wide habitat protection with particular emphasis on locally developed strategies for private and public lands; to support efforts that defend wild places from destructive practices such as mining, unsustainable logging, and over-grazing; to support efforts that create understanding of the relationship between wildlife, habitat protection and long-term economic stability; to protect the world's last remaining vast tracts of relatively undisturbed forestlands. (Please note the special geographic focus of Russia, Brazil and British Columbia, Canada for this funding priority); to protect forest ecosystems through reducing wood consumption, eliminating waste, and promoting safe, sustainable non-wood alternatives. The Foundation awards both general support and project-specific grants. See The Foundation website for limitations. Grant proposals are reviewed four times per year. See The Foundation website for proposal review dates and deadlines.
Fiancial assistance. No cost sharing required. 501(c)3 organizations or projects with a 501(c)3 fiscal sponsor are eligible. Although The Foundation considers programs that are both national and international in scope, state and local programs are also considered. Priority consideration is given to programs in Alaska, New Mexico, Montana, Colorado, Nebraska, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida
The Compton Foundation Environment Priorities include: land, river and watershed protection and management for purposes of long term habitat and ecosystem preservation and restoration; changing the relationship between people and the natural environment in order to promote a sustainable and just balance between meeting present human needs and conserving natural systems for future generations. See The Foundation website for examples. Proposals must be received by February 15 for Board consideration in May and September 15 for Board consideration in December.
Financial Assistance Non-profit organizations whose projects have regional, statewide (especially Pacific Coast states), or national significance. U.S. non-profits collaborating with non-profits in Mexico are also eligible.
The Lindbergh Foundation Lindbergh Grants are made in the following categories: agriculture; aviation/aerospace; conservation of natural resources - including animals, plants, water, and general conservation (land, air, energy, etc.); education - including humanities/education, the arts, and intercultural communication; exploration; health - including biomedical research, health and population sciences, and adaptive technology; and waste minimization and management. The Foundation is interested in funding a variety of innovative research and educational projects which focus on the Lindbergh's vision of balance between the advance of technology and preservation of the natural/human environment. See The Foundation website for examples. The deadline for grant applications is the second Thursday of June in the year preceeding the awarding of funds. All applicants receive notification of final selections by April 15 of the following year. Provides grants of up to $10,580 (a symbolic amount representing the cost of the "Spirit of St. Louis") meant to serve as seed moneyfor pilot projects. Individuals from government agencies, media, universities, and other non-profit organizations from the U.S. and abroad.

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