News Release
Southeast Region

 

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Christmas Bird Counts on National Wildlife Refuges in the Southeast

December 13, 2013

Contacts:

 

 

A close-up of a great horned owl.

Great Horned Owl at John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge, PA
Photo credit: Susan Rachlin - USFWS

 

“On the first day of Christmas my true love gave to me a partridge in a pear tree.” If you are a bird lover, this holiday song may be especially near and dear to your heart. Of course no one in their right mind would turn down five golden rings, but to be presented with an opportunity to watch seven swans a swimming – as a birding enthusiast, that’s something you cannot put a price on. That priceless gift of enjoying birds in their natural habitat is one that is being protected by a time-honored tradition known as the Christmas Bird Count.

The Christmas Bird Count is a long-standing program of the National Audubon Society, and this year marks’ the 114th Count. It is the oldest and largest citizen science event in the world. Between December 14th and January 5th, thousands of volunteers across the United States, Canada and many countries in the Western Hemisphere go out from dusk until dawn counting birds. Volunteers follow routes through a designated 15-mile diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear all day.

The Christmas Bird Count originated from a holiday tradition known as the Christmas “Side Hunt.” Before the turn of the century participants would choose sides and go afield with their guns, and whoever brought in the biggest pile of feathered (and furred) quarry won. It was ornithologist Frank Chapman, an early officer in the then budding Audubon Society, who proposed a new holiday tradition, a “Christmas Bird Census,” that would count birds on the holidays rather than hunt them. The first Christmas Bird Count took place on Christmas Day in 1900.

The Christmas Bird Count is not only a fun holiday tradition, but one that provides critical data on bird population trends. Its data informs strategies to protect birds and their habitat, and helps to identify environmental issues with implications for humans. In the 1980s, Christmas Bird Count data documented the decline of wintering populations of the American Black Duck. This led to conservation measures being put into effect to reduce hunting pressure on this species.

Another important scientific contribution the Christmas Bird Count has made is its data relating to climate change. The movement of North American bird species revealed by Audubon's Birds and Climate Change Report in 2009 is one of 24 key indicators included in a new Environmental Protection Agency report showing how climate change impacts Americans' health and environment. Audubon’s analysis relied on 40 years of data from the Christmas Bird Count.

National Wildlife Refuges provide habitat for over 700 species of birds. More than 200 refuges were created to specifically to protect, manage and restore habitat for migratory birds. Each year, millions of migrating birds use refuges as stepping-stones while they fly thousands of miles between their summer and winter homes. We are proud to provide havens for birds across the southeast, and compiled the following information of bird counts on refuges.

 

 

 


 

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ALABAMA

A sandhill crane looking for food.

Greater Sandhill Crane at Malheur Refuge.
Photo credit: Roger Baker - USFWS

Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge -http://www.fws.gov/wheeler/
Saturday, December 14, 2013
Where: 3121 Visitor Center Road, Decatur, AL 35603
Contact: Dwight Cooley - USFWS, 256-353-7243
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/uploadedFiles/Region_4/NWRS/Zone_3/Wheeler_Complex/Wheeler/BirdsofWheelerNWR.pdf

Considered the eastern-most National Wildlife Refuge of the Mississippi Flyway, Wheeler annually supports Alabama’s largest concentration of wintering waterfowl. In the past, the refuge has supported up to 60,000 geese and nearly 125,000 ducks. Since 1990, winter goose populations have dropped dramatically. Present day numbers usually peak around 2,000 for geese and 75,000 for ducks. Numbers peak in early January. Waterfowl may be viewed from the Observation Building and large concentrations of both diving and dabbling ducks can be found at the waterfowl impoundment area.

Wheeler is one of the more productive inland count areas around, usually yielding 115-120 species, and always including some unusual birds. Birders of all skill levels are welcome and needed. Dress appropriately, as this group will go out in all types of weather!

To join a party, meet at the Wheeler Refuge Visitor Center south off Hwy 67, east of Decatur. From I-65 take exit 334 and head toward Decatur; after crossing the water, the road to the Visitor Center will be on the left. We’ll regroup there at sundown for the tally (compilation), which is a lot of fun. Bring binoculars, a spotting scope, if you have one, and lunch!

 

 

 

 


 

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ARKANSAS

A mallard duck.

A mallard duck.
Photo credit: Richard

Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge -http://www.fws.gov/felsenthal/
Saturday, January 4, 2014
Where: 5531 Highway 82 West, Crossett, AR 71635
Contact: Richard Stitch, President, Friends of Felsenthal, 870-510-5254
Refuge Bird List: http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/birds/chekbird/r4/felsenth.htm

Well known in the hunting community, Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge is a 65,000 acre haven for waterfowl and migrating songbirds. Historically, periodic flooding of the bottomland hardwoods during winter and spring provided excellent wintering waterfowl habitat. These wetlands, in combination with the pine and upland hardwood forest on the higher ridges, support a wide diversity of native plants and animals.

Many birds species nest year-round on the refuge, including the great blue heron, mallard, great-horned owl, pine warbler, American coot, tufted titmouse and wood duck. Experienced birders may wish to seek out less common winter visitors such as the winter wren, gold-crowned kinglet and orange-crowned warbler. Participants usually have the pleasure of seeing at least one bald eagle during the Christmas count.

 

 

 

A female cardinal in a tree.

Female cardinal.
Photo credit: Richard

Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/hollabend/
Thursday, January 2, 2014
Where: 10448 Holla Bend Road, Dardanelle, AR 72834
Contact: Leif Anderson, US Forest Service, leanderson@fs.fed.us, 479-284-3150 ext. 3151
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/southeast/pubs/holla-bend_birdlist.pdf

The Holla Bend count includes a lot of land that is not on the refuge, so it is very important that anyone wanting to help or participate contact Leif by December 16th so that he can assign them to a group. Some of the groups do no meet up on the refuge. No experience in birding is necessary but being with folks that have experience will make the day more exciting.

The refuge's primary purpose is to provide a winter home for a portion of the millions of ducks and geese that use the Mississippi Flyway each year. It is not uncommon for the refuge to host up to 100,000 ducks and geese at once. Bald eagles are also common from December through February. Winter brings an abundance of morning doves, Northern cardinals, savannah sparrows, white-crowned sparrows, American robins, and yellow-rumped warblers. Ruby-crowned kinglets, belted kingfishers, brown-headed cowbirds and and house sparrows are also common.

 

 

 

 


 

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FLORIDA

A Florida scrub-jay.

Florida scrub-jay.
Photo credit: Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission

Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/merrittisland/
Tuesday, December 17, 2013
Where: from I-95, take Exit 220 (Titusville, State Road 406 Exit). Drive east on SR406, also known as Garden Street.
Continue east on Garden Street for 4 miles and travel over the Max Brewer Causeway Bridge. The Refuge begins at the east side of the causeway.
Contact: Ned Steel, 40+ year CBC Volunteer, nedsteel@msn.com
Refuge Bird List: http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/birds/chekbird/r4/merritt.htm

Merritt Island is known for its abundant birdlife and is a major destination for birders from throughout the world. Over 320 species have been documented, and Christmas Bird Count coordinator Ned Steel states that the refuge is typically among the refuges with the highest counts in terms of number of species seen. The peak season for birding is the cooler months between October and April, with optimum conditions occurring from December to February. During these periods, hundreds of thousands of migratory birds use the refuge as a temporary rest stop or spend the entire winter season loafing in refuge impoundments.

A good portion of count is in security area not usually open to public, which makes this experience unique. Plus there’s morning coffee and doughnuts! Participants are likely to see threatened Florida scrub-jays, actively feeding reddish egrets, and lots of bald eagles. Flamingos, common moorhens and black-bellied plovers are just a handful of additional species that may also be present.

 

 

 

A Wild turkey.

Wild turkey.
Photo credit: John Beetham

Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/floridapanther/
Monday, December 16, 2013
Contact: Jim Krakowski, Volunteer, jameskrakowski@msn.com
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/floridapanther/species_list.html#birds

The 26,400 acre refuge is composed of a variety of wetland and upland habitats including pine flatwoods, cypress strands and domes,
wet prairies, tropical hardwood hammocks and hydric pinelands. Large concentrations of wading and water birds feed, nest, and roost on
the refuge. Wild turkeys are frequently seen on the refuge, as are many species of song birds, hawks, and owls.

 

 

 

A Peregrine falcon.

Peregrine falcon.
Photo credit: Frank Doyle

Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/floridapanther/TenThousandIslands/
Friday, January 3, 2014
Contact: Jim Krakowski, Volunteer, jameskrakowski@msn.com
Refuge Bird List: http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/birds/chekbird/r4/tenthou.htm

This 35,000 acres refuge protects important mangrove habitats and a rich diversity of native wildlife. It is part of the largest expanses of mangrove forest in North America. Approximately two thirds of the refuge is mangrove forest, which dominates most tidal fringes and the numerous islands (or keys). The northern third of the refuge consists of brackish marsh and interspersed ponds, and small coastal hammocks of oak, cabbage palms, and tropical hardwoods such as gumbo limbo.

Over 189 species of birds use the refuge at some time during the year. Prominent bird groups include wading birds, shorebirds, diving water birds, and raptors. Notable threatened and endangered bird species include the bald eagle, peregrine falcon, and wood stork.

 

 

 

A Roseate spoonbills.

Roseate spoonbills.
Photo credit: Harold Wagle

J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/dingdarling/
Saturday, December 14, 2013
Where: 1 Wildlife Drive, Sanibel, FL 33957
Contact: Jeremy Conrad, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, jeremy_conrad@fws.gov
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/dingdarling/pdf/birdchecklistpdf.pdf

Organized and administered by the San-Cap Chapter of Audubon Society, the survey will begin at 7:45 AM and volunteers who have registered to participate in the survey are meeting in the refuge parking lot. There are five zones and five teams that will be covering the survey.

The 6,000+ acres of the refuge contain a variety of subtropical habitats, including the upland ridges and freshwater swales of the island’s interior ecosystem as well as the mangrove forest and seagrass beds of its estuarine mangrove fringes. Numerous neotropical migrants and resident birds depend on this variety of habitats for their existence. Participants can expect to see white pelicans, double-crested cormorants, roseate spoonbills, magnificent frigate, and the endangered woodstork.

 

 

 

 


 

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GEORGIA

 Wood storks.

Wood storks.
Photo credit: Larry Richardson - USFWS

Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/harrisneck/
Friday, December 20, 2014
Where: Located in McIntosh County, Georgia, 5 miles north of Eulonia. Take Exit 67 off I-95 and travel south on U.S. 17
for approximately one mile, then east on Harris Neck Road for seven miles to the main entrance gate.
Contact: Dot Bambach, dotbam@bellsouth.net, 912-598-3764
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/southeast/pubs/savbrd.pdf

Harris Neck is one of seven refuges managed by the Savannah Coastal Refuges Complex. Its 2,824 acres consist of salt marsh, open fields, forested wetland and mixed hardwood/pine forest. Because of this great diversity in habitat, many species of birds are attracted to the refuge throughout the year. In the winter, waterfowl such as gadwall, northern pintail and red-breasted merganser can be found feeding and resting on the refuge. Other winter visitors include the horned grebe, red-throated loon, northern gannet, double-crested cormorant, and blue-headed vireo.

Dot Bambach, the event coordinator, is looking for volunteers to assist with the count. In addition to skilled birders, she’s seeking drivers and list-keepers who can give the better part of their day to be out in the field. They are also seeking for individuals who will watch their backyard feeders for a portion of the morning and report their sightings. If you would like to participate, please contact Dot at dotbam@belsouth.net.

 

 

 

Pintail.

Pintail.
Photo credit: Coniferconifer

Savannah National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/savannah/
Saturday, January 4, 2014
Where: although the refuge’s visitor center is located in South Carolina, the count will cover most of greater Savannah and the
southern part of Jasper County, SC.
Contact: Dot Bambach, dotbam@bellsouth.net, 912-598-3764
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/southeast/pubs/savbrd.pdf

Savannah National Wildlife Refuge consists of over 29,000 acres of freshwater marshes, tidal rivers and creeks and bottomland hardwoods. The variety of birdlife within the Lowcountry is enhanced by its location on the Atlantic Flyway. During the winter months, thousands of ring-necked, teal, pintails, and as many as ten other species of ducks migrate into the area, joining resident wood ducks on the refuge. You may also spot visiting white-throated sparrows, dark-eyed juncos, yellow-rumped warblers, American goldfinches or a rare rusty blackbird.

Dot Bambach, the event coordinator, is looking for volunteers to assist with the count. In addition to skilled birders, she’s seeking drivers and list-keepers who can give the better part of their day to be out in the field. They are also seeking for individuals who will watch their backyard feeders for a portion of the morning and report their sightings. If you would like to participate, please contact Dot at dotbam@belsouth.net.

 

 

 

 


 

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LOUISIANA

 White pelican.

White pelican.
Photo credit: Mark Stewart - USFWS

Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/bayousauvage/
Saturday, December 28, 2013
Where: traveling from Slidell, take I-10 west; take Irish Bayou exit #254; turn left onto Highway 11. Traveling from New Orleans, take I-10 east
to exit #246A (Chalmette, I-510); go about 2 miles on I-510 to Highway 90 east exit.; turn left and go approximately 4 miles.
Contact: David Muth, National Wildlife Federation, muthd@nwf.org
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/bayousauvage/_documents/BayouSauvageBirds'13.pdf

Bayou Sauvage is included in the New Orleans area Christmas Bird Count. The refuge contains a variety of habitats, including freshwater and brackish marshes, coastal hardwood forests, lagoons, canals, borrow pits, cheniers (former beach fronts) and natural bayous. This habitat diversity meets the needs of over 340 bird species during various seasons of the year. Peak waterfowl populations of over 25,000 use the wetland areas during the fall, winter, and early spring months.

The marshes located inside the hurricane protection levees are dominated by wiregrass, fall panicum, switchgrass, sprangletop, and coastal waterhyssop. The freshwater bodies are characterized by coontail, water-celery, and southern niad. These habitats are important to waterbirds, such as waterfowl, wading birds, shorebirds, and secretive marsh birds.

The refuge bird list includes 255 species and also explains the type of refuge habitat where birders are most likely to spot the species. White pelicans are present in the winter months, and anhingas are present year-round on open water. The white ibis and clapper rail may be seen on the marsh.

 

 

 

Brown pelicans nesting.

Brown pelicans nesting.
Photo credit: Greg Thompson - USFWS

Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/bigbranchmarsh/
Monday, December 30, 2013
Where: the refuge headquarters is co-located with the Southeast Louisiana Refuges' headquarters on a beautiful property in Lacombe, LA.
The offices are on Highway 434, two miles south of I-12 (Exit 74) and just north of the intersection of 434 and Highway 190. Look for the Big Branch Marsh Refuge sign.
Contact: Tom Tenchard, trench19@hotmail.com
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/southeast/pubs/Bigbranchbird.pdf

Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge is identified in the Eastern Florida Parishes loop of the America's Wetland Birding trail. (You can view the brochure of the Atchafalaya Loop here.) Its over 15,000 acres comprise the largest undeveloped natural area along the northern shore of Lake Pontchartrain. From sandy beaches to hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods, a diversity of habitats support a wide variety of wildlife species. Brown pelicans and red-cockaded woodpeckers can be found year-round on the refuge. In the winter months, commonly spotted species include the white ibis, snow goose, snowy egret, killdeer, spotted sandpiper, loggerhead shrike and blue jay.

 

 

 

 


 

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MISSISSIPPI

 Yellow-crowned night heron.

Yellow-crowned night heron.
Photo credit: Keenan Adams

Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/dahomey/
Friday, January 3, 2014
Where: 831 Highway 446, Boyle, MS 38730
Contact: Becky Rosamond, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Becky_Rosamond@fws.gov, 662-226-8286
Refuge Bird List: http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/birds/chekbird/r4/dahomey.htm

The refuge is the largest contiguous tract of bottomland hardwood forest in northwest Mississippi, outside of the mainline levee. Flooded forests provide important habitat for overwintering waterfowl, such as wood ducks. Other species that may be seen in the winter months include the occasional yellow-crowned night heron, glossy ibis and tundra swan.

After the survey is finished, everyone gathers at the refuge headquarters for a warm cup of chili, served by the Friends of Dahomey, and discusses what was seen as the counts are tallied.

 

 

 

 Bald eagle.

Bald eagle.
Photo credit: USFWS

Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/noxubee/
Friday, January 3, 2014
Where: 2970 Bluff Lake Road, Brooksville, Mississippi 39739
Contact: Terry Schiefer, 662-325-2989, tschiefer@entymology.msstate.edu
Refuge Bird List: http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/birds/chekbird/r4/noxubee.htm

At Noxubee, the Christmas Bird Count is a day of birds and fellowship. All levels of birders are welcome.

The Refuge provides needed habitat protection for the extremely valuable, rapidly disappearing bottomland hardwood forest communities. The endangered red-cockaded woodpecker relies on the Refuge for its existence in east-central Mississippi. In addition, many neotropic species greatly benefit from the refuge forests. During fall and winter, Refuge visitors delight in the antics of the bald eagle. These beautiful birds are sighted on a regular basis from November through February. The golden eagle is also seen during this period.

At the 2012 Christmas Bird Count, double-crested cormorants were in seen abundance. Hundreds of ring-necked duck, hooded merganser, American robin, and chipping sparrow were counted.

 

 

 

 


 

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NORTH CAROLINA

Golden-crowned kinglet.

Golden-crowned kinglet.
Photo credit: Brendan Lally

Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/peaisland/
Saturday, December 28, 2013
Where: meet at 6:30am at Whalebone Junction at the north entrance of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore
(intersection of US HWY 64 with NC Route 12) for the final briefing
Contact: Paul W. Sykes, Jr., jjsykes@charter.net
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/southeast/pubs/PeaIsland_birdlist.pdf

Pea Island was established to provide nesting, resting, and wintering habitat for migratory birds, including the greater snow geese and other migratory waterfowl, shorebirds, wading birds, raptors, and neotropical migrants. The Refuge is known as a “Birder's Paradise,” as the bird list boasts more than 365 species.

Common species during the winter months include snow goose, northern gannet, nothern shoveler, green-winged teal, golden-crowned kinglet, yellow-rumped warbler and white-throated sparrow.

 

 

 

Razorbill.

Razorbill.
Photo credit: Bill Thompson - USFWS

Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/mattamuskeet/
Sunday, December 29, 2013
Where: Mattamuskeet Visitor Center, 85 Mattamuskeet Road, Swan Quarter, NC 27885
Contact: Susan Campbell, 910-949-3207, susan@ncaves.com
Refuge Bird List: http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/birds/chekbird/r4/mattamus.htm

Mattamuskeet Refuge consists of 50,180 acres of open water, marsh, timber, and croplands. The Refuge’s main feature is the shallow 40,000 acre Lake Mattamuskeet, the largest natural lake in North Carolina. The Refuge provides habitat for migratory birds and other wildlife, and is known among wildlife enthusiasts for the thousands of wintering waterfowl that it attracts each year.

This count will tally a lot of water birds (ducks, swans, geese, wading birds, gulls and terns), raptors (often a golden eagle mixed in with the abundant bald eagles), sparrows, finches and even wintering warblers. The causeway over lake holds greatest warbler diversity in the state of North Carolina in winter. Participants covering the Sound usually find seabirds such as Northern gannets, scoters, and sometimes razorbills.

 

 

 

 


 

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PUERTO RICO

Northern Parula.

Northern Parula.
Photo credit: Laura Gooch

Cabo Rojo National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/caribbean/refuges/caborojo/
Saturday, December 28, 2013
Where: from Mayaguez, drive south on Route 2 (main highway) and exit Route 100 toward Cabo Rojo. When Route 100 ends,
turn left onto Route 101. Drive .8 mile, then turn right onto Route 301. Drive approximately 3 miles and look for refuge sign.
Contact: Alcides Morales, Puerto Rican Ornithological Society, 787-404-7703
Refuge Bird List: http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/birds/chekbird/other/caborojo.htm

The first Christmas Bird Count in Puerto Rico was conducted in 1980 on Cabo Rojo National Wildlife Refuge. This year’s bird count begins at 6:00am, and participants will gather at the Cabo Rojo Salt Flats.

The Caribbean Islands compose one of the most diverse ecosystems within the United States. In just a few miles an observer can travel from a tropical rain forest to the sub-tropical dry forest ecosystem. Coral reefs, mangrove swamps, gorgeous rivers and streams, forested and herbaceous wetlands are within the most prominent ecosystems in the Caribbean Islands.

Many birds find their way to the refuge while migrating between North and South America, including the Praire Warbler, Northern Parula and Cape May Warbler. These birds use the refuge during the cooler months, while resident species including the Puerto Rican Tody, Adelaide's Warbler; Caribbean Elaenia, Troupial and the endangered Yellow-shouldered Blackbird are present year-round.

 

 

 

 


 

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SOUTH CAROLINA

Red-cockaded woodpecker.

Red-cockaded woodpecker.
Photo credit: USFWS

Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/carolinasandhills/
Sunday, December 15, 2014
Where: 23734 U.S. Highway 1, McBee, SC 29101
Contact: Nancy Jordan, US Fish & Wildlife Service, nancy_jordan@fws,gov, 843-335-6026
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/southeast/pubs/CarolinaSandhillsBirdList.pdf

Birdwatching is a favorite activity at Carolina Sandhills. The Refuge is home to nearly 200 species of birds and has one of the largest remaining populations of red-cockaded woodpeckers, an endangered species that builds its nesting cavity in living pine trees. The refuge is also home to the southern bald eagle, many species of water birds, raptors, songbirds, and a variety of migratory waterfowl.

Migrating ducks and geese begin to arrive in October and remain through early March. Other species that you may spot include brown-headed nuthatches, northern harriers, American Kestrels, and yellow-bellied sapsuckers.

If you're looking for a place to flesh out your "life list" of birds you've spotted, definitely consider Carolina Sandhills as a prime destination. This year is the refuge’s 35th Christmas Bird Count. Interested parties should contact Nancy Jordan to register for the count, which begins at the refuge visitor center at 6:15am.

 

 

 

Tunda swan.

Tunda swan.
Photo credit: USFWS

Santee National Wildlife Refuge - http://www.fws.gov/santee/
Saturday, December 21, 2013
Where: Santee Visitor's Center, 2125 Ft. Watson Rd, Summerton, SC 29148
Contact: Dr. Dennis Forsythe, dennis.forsythe@gmail.com
Refuge Bird List: http://www.fws.gov/santee/pdf/Santeebird11.pdf

The Santee Christmas Bird Count has been touted as one of the best, if not the best inland Christmas Bird Count east of the Mississippi by well-known South Carolina ornithologist, the late Dr. Robin Carter. (Click to view Audubon’s past bird count data.) The refuge is located on the north shore of Lake Marion, the largest lake in South Carolina. It is a major wintering area for ducks and geese, as well as a nesting and stopover area for neo-tropical migratory birds, raptors, shorebirds, and wading birds.

The refuge has current reports of sandhill cranes, Canada geese, white fronted geese, lots of ducks, wild turkey, meadow larks, kinglets, hawks and eagles, loons, tundra swans, and migratory songbirds. The painted buntings have all gone south but they’ll be back in the summer.

Participants at all levels are welcome to join.

 

 


 

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The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov/southeast.  Connect with us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/usfwssoutheast, follow our tweets at www.twitter.com/usfwssoutheast, watch our YouTube Channel at http://www.youtube.com/usfws, and download photos from our Flickr page at http://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwssoutheast.

 

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Last updated: February 20, 2014