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Spill Safety and Leadership Course Images

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Felix Lopez, Contaminants Specialist Boqueron Ecological Services Field Office, Puerto Rico, instructs Peggy Whitacker, Oil spill NERDA specialist, Panama City, FL how to fire a “Screamer Siren” pyrotechnic device.  It is a used to scare birds away from landing in an oil spill. Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS  April 11, 2007
Felix Lopez, Contaminants Specialist Boqueron Ecological Services Field Office, Puerto Rico, instructs Peggy Whitacker, Oil spill NERDA specialist, Panama City, FL how to fire a “Screamer Siren” pyrotechnic device. It is a used to scare birds away from landing in an oil spill. Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS April 11, 2007
Barthel Joseph III,  Reed-Joseph International Company, shows students a rotating propane canon at the Spill Safety and Leadership Course, Lafayette, La
Barthel Joseph III, Reed-Joseph International Company, shows students a rotating propane canon at the Spill Safety and Leadership Course, Lafayette, La

Dwight LeBlanc, Louisiana State Director, U.S.D.A. Wildlife Services shows oil responder students rocket assisted netting devices for possible use during oil spill response recovery actions.  These rocket nets are fired over oiled birds to capture them for clean up and release.  Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS  April 10, 2007
Dwight LeBlanc, Louisiana State Director, U.S.D.A. Wildlife Services shows oil responder students rocket assisted netting devices for possible use during oil spill response recovery actions. These rocket nets are fired over oiled birds to capture them for clean up and release. Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS April 10, 2007
News media from Lafayette, La.  cover the training and provide realistic addition to the oil response training. In addition to airboat and helicopter training, the students also practiced media relations.  Photo by Tom MacKenzie  April 11, 2007
News media from Lafayette, La. cover the training and provide realistic addition to the oil response training. In addition to airboat and helicopter training, the students also practiced media relations. Photo by Tom MacKenzie April 11, 20077

Harold Doucet, Clean Gulf Associates, talks with students on the logistic requirements of wildlife cleaning.  “It takes 345 gallons of water just to clean one oiled Pelican,” said Doucet.  Photo by Tom MacKenzie  April 11, 2007
Harold Doucet, Clean Gulf Associates, talks with students on the logistic requirements of wildlife cleaning. “It takes 345 gallons of water just to clean one oiled Pelican,” said Doucet. Photo by Tom MacKenzie April 11, 2007
Dee Goldman, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Park Manager, Atchafalaya Basin Floodway System, prepares to fire a CAPA long range hazing pyrotechnic rocket. The rocket carries a cartridge 1,000 feet before making a loud 150 decibel report.  Photo by Tom MacKenzie  April 11, 2007
Dee Goldman, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Park Manager, Atchafalaya Basin Floodway System, prepares to fire a CAPA long range hazing pyrotechnic rocket. The rocket carries a cartridge 1,000 feet before making a loud 150 decibel report. Photo by Tom MacKenzie April 11, 2007
Felix Lopez, Contaminants Specialist Boqueron Ecological Services Field Office, Puerto Rico, ensures safe operations as Peggy Whitacker, Oil spill NERDA specialist, Panama City, FL fires a “Screamer Siren” pyrotechnic device.  It is a used to scare birds away from landing in an oil spill. Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS  April 11, 2007  Note: Cajundome in background.
Felix Lopez, Contaminants Specialist Boqueron Ecological Services Field Office, Puerto Rico, ensures safe operations as Peggy Whitacker, Oil spill NERDA specialist, Panama City, FL fires a “Screamer Siren” pyrotechnic device. It is a used to scare birds away from landing in an oil spill. Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS April 11, 2007 Note: Cajundome in background.
Peter Tuttle, Resource Contaminants Specialist at Daphni Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, proudly displays his alligator handling prowess with a five-foot long wild alligator (with safely rubber bands on jaws) at the Wildlife Services section of Oil Spill and HAZMAT response and leadership course April 10-12, 2007 in Lafayette, La.  The alligators were released back into the wild after the training.  Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS. The nutria and an opossum in the cages behind Peter were also used in animal handling demonstrations.
Peter Tuttle, Resource Contaminants Specialist at Daphni Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, proudly displays his alligator handling prowess with a five-foot long wild alligator (with safely rubber bands on jaws) at the Wildlife Services section of Oil Spill and HAZMAT response and leadership course April 10-12, 2007 in Lafayette, La. The alligators were released back into the wild after the training. Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS. The nutria and an opossum in the cages behind Peter were also used in animal handling demonstrations.
 Marine Safety Technician 2 Harry Howard, Coast Guard Sector Mobile, Al., Pollution Investigator fires a “Screamer Rocket”
Marine Safety Technician 2 Harry Howard, Coast Guard Sector Mobile, Al., Pollution Investigator fires a “Screamer Rocket”


Photos credit to Tom MacKenzie, USFWS

 


Contact:
Tom R. MacKenzie
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
1875 Century Boulevard, Suite 410
Atlanta, GA 30345
(404) 679-7291
Fax: (404) 679-7286


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