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New Manager at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 19, 2005

Contacts:
Elsie Davis, 404/679-7107
Troy Littrell, 334-678-4065




Troy Littrell, a ten-year veteran of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is the new refuge manager at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge in Eufaula, Alabama.

“Troy has a wealth of knowledge and management experience, having worked in four different Fish and Wildlife Service regions,” said Sam D. Hamilton, the Service’s Southeast Regional Director. “He started his career in Tennessee, and we’re glad he has returned to the Southeast.”

Littrell began his career with the Service through the Cooperative Education Program in 1995. He worked as a Refuge Manager Trainee at Reelfoot National Wildlife Refuge in Tennessee and eventually became the Assistant Refuge Manager from 1996 through 1999. From Tennessee he moved to Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Brigham City, Utah (Mountain Prairie Region) were he gained valuable experience working with water rights and water management on a large wetland complex from 1999 through 2001. He then moved to Canaan Valley NWR in West Virginia (Northeast Region) as the Deputy Refuge Manager from 2001 through 2003. He also served as the acting Project Leader for Canaan Valley NWR and gained important experience negotiating public use and access issues.

He was the Refuge Manager at Aransas NWR in Austwell, Texas from 2003 through 2005, where he gained experience working with endangered species and a large public use program. Littrell also worked to establish a partnership with the Guadalupe Blanco River Authority and the Guadalupe Blanco River Trust in an effort to improve the water delivery capabilities to the refuge, improve the environmental education opportunities for the local schools, enhance waterfowl impoundments on the refuge and to provide better habitat on adjacent private lands.

“I have ten years of experience managing waterfowl habitat, and I will work diligently with partners to enhance the existing impoundments on Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge,” said Littrell.

“The community has welcomed my family with open arms, and I am excited about making Eufaula home. I am impressed with the community support and their knowledge of the refuge. One of my goals is to establish a Friends group for Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge and from what I can already see about this community, it really looks promising,” said Littrell.

“I also have an interest in environmental education and providing an outdoor classroom for our local schools. We reside in a rural area and most of these students do not have an opportunity to visit a big zoo or some other exhibit, but we have an even better learning experience available right next door on the refuge. I will work to develop a positive outreach program for this station because it is so important for the young people who live here,” continued Littrell.

Littrell holds a bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Biology from the University of Tennessee at Martin. He and his wife, Dianne, have one daughter, Abigail, who is three years old. Littrell enjoys hunting deer, waterfowl, and turkey, and he enjoys Southeastern Conference football.

Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1964 to provide food and resting habitat for wood ducks and other migratory waterfowl on the Walter F. George Reservoir (Lake Eufaula) in cooperation with the Corps of Engineers and with strong support of key leaders of Eufaula, Alabama. The reservoir resulted from impoundment of the Chattahoochee River, which separates Alabama and Georgia. The refuge lies on the upper reaches of the reservoir and consist of 11,184 acres. More than 350,000 visitors annually enjoy hunting, fishing, interpretive programs, wildlife observation, and environmental education.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. The Service manages the 95-million-acre National Wildlife Refuge System which encompasses 545 national wildlife refuges, thousands of small wetlands, and other special management areas. It also operates 70 national fish hatcheries, 64 fishery resource offices, and 78 ecological services field stations. The agency enforces federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat such as wetlands, and helps foreign governments with their conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Aid program that distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to state fish and wildlife agencies.


Troy Littrell
Tony Littrell


For more information about the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, visit our home page at http://www.fws.gov/southeast or http://www.fws.gov/.


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