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Entergy Corporation and the Trust for Public Land to Announce Addition of Reforested Lands to the National Wildlife Refuge System
Join a Round Table Discussion On Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation

 

MEDIA ADVISORY
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 28, 2004

Contacts:
Cindy Hoffman, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 202/208-3008
Suzanne Cousineau,
Entergy Corporation, 504/576-4352
Tim Ahern,
Trust for Public Land, 202/255-0761

 

Entergy Corporation and the Trust for Public Land will announce the addition of 2,208 acres of reforested land to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge. The Service will acquire the $2.4 million tract from the Trust for Public Land. Entergy has invested an additional $250,000 to reforest the privately owned land near Tallulah, Louisiana. The Trust for Public Land partnered with Entergy to establish a model conservation program for carbon sequestration through reforestation. This initiative is part of the Chicago Mills Project, a four-year, $15.7 M carbon project that will conserve more than 11,000 acres in the Lower Mississippi River Valley.

Join us for a round table discussion on the benefits of carbon sequestration, the emerging trend of carbon sequestration as a land conservation tool in the United States, and the emerging market of carbon credits with independent experts and representatives of the Department of Interior, Entergy Corporation and the Trust for Public Land.

DATE:

Tuesday, September 28, 2004

TIME:

10-11:30 AM

LOCATION:

Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, NW
Room 5160
Washington DC

DIAL IN OPTION:

1-888-957-9819, Passcode: 12831
Leader: Ms. Cindy Hoffman

SPEAKERS:

Steven Griles, Deputy Secretary, Department of the Interior
Mark Savoff, Executive Vice President, Entergy Corporation
Don Morrow, Senior Project Manager, Trust for Public Land
Rich Rosenzwiet, Managing Director, Global Climate Change Markets/Natsource
Wiley Barbour, Managing Director, Environmental Resources Trust

RSVP if you plan to attend the press round table.


Click on maps to download 300 dpi.

Carbon Emissions and Forest Loss in the Lower MS River Valley
Carbon Emissions and Forest Loss in the Lower MS River Valley
Carbon Sequestration Project in the Lower MS River Valley
Carbon Sequestration Project in the Lower MS River Valley


Click on photos to download 300 dpi.


Seedlings are planted 12 feet apart which results in 302 seedlings per acre.
Seedlings are planted 12 feet apart which results in 302 seedlings per acre.

Tensas River NWR has some of the best remaining bottomland hardwood forest in the Lower Mississippi River Valley.  Staff had to take two measurements to get the total circumference of this huge cypress.  The estimated diameter at breast height circumference equalled 121 feet.
Tensas River NWR has some of the best remaining bottomland hardwood forest in the Lower Mississippi River Valley. Staff had to take two measurements to get the total circumference of this huge cypress. The estimated diameter at breast height circumference equalled 121 feet.
A federally threatened female Louisiana black bear and her cubs overlook a cypress brake that is located within the bottomland hardwood forest of Tensas River NWR.
A federally threatened female Louisiana black bear and her cubs overlook a cypress brake that is located within the bottomland hardwood forest of Tensas River NWR.
Thousands of ducks utilize moist soil impoundments that are full of natural food plants or cooperatively farmed crops such as corn, sorghum or soybeans.
Thousands of ducks utilize moist soil impoundments that are full of natural food plants or cooperatively farmed crops such as corn, sorghum or soybeans.
ESI contract planter prepares to plant a variety of bottomland hardwood seedlings that includes such species as nuttall oak, water oak, bald cypress and sweet gum.
ESI contract planter prepares to plant a variety of bottomland hardwood seedlings that includes such species as nuttall oak, water oak, bald cypress and sweet gum.
After creating a hole with his dibble bar and placing a seedling inside, this ESI contract planter inserts the dibble bar into the ground a few inches behind the first hole and pushes forward.  This closes the first hole and seals the soil around the roots, which alleviates air pockets and increases the seedling chance of survival.
After creating a hole with his dibble bar and placing a seedling inside, this ESI contract planter inserts the dibble bar into the ground a few inches behind the first hole and pushes forward. This closes the first hole and seals the soil around the roots, which alleviates air pockets and increases the seedling chance of survival.
Refuge forester and staff sort, count and prepare seedlings for planting. Certain species of seedlings must be planted at particular locations within a field based on topography and/or soil types.
Refuge forester and staff sort, count and prepare seedlings for planting. Certain species of seedlings must be planted at particular locations within a field based on topography and/or soil types.

 


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