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Clean Vessel Act Pumpout Grant Program Awards Announced

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 27, 2004

Contact:
Nicholas Throckmorton, 202/208-5636

 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today awarded nearly $11 million to 23 states under the Clean Vessel Act Pumpout Grant program. The grant awards will fund construction of sewage dump stations and pumpout stations for recreational boaters and educational programs that inform boaters about the importance of proper waste disposal.

Interior Secretary Gale Norton stated, "The Fish and Wildlife Service, in conjunction with the U.S. Coast Guard, the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency, marine industry organizations, and others at the local level, are assisting with outreach to best educate the public in ways that will protect fish and marine habitat. All of the partners involved are providing the best resources and tools to continue this successful program."

"The Clean Vessel Act Pumpout Program exemplifies one of the many partnerships the Service has with the States," said Service Director Steve Williams. "Since its inception, forty-nine states have participated in this program to improve the quality of our Nation's water and conserve fish and wildlife resources."

The 23 states will use the grant money in the following ways:

Alabama: The state plans to install three new pumpout systems in coastal areas and five in inland areas. In addition, program funds will be used to continue educational projects.

Alaska: Program funds will be used to install pumpout stations in Juneau and Seward, rehabilitate existing pumpout station equipment at five locations, and distribute a pamphlet that will increase boater's awareness of the need for proper waste disposal.

Arizona: The State plans to add new pump-out facilities at Lake Powell and Lake Pleasant.

Arkansas: Program funds will be used to continue boater awareness and educational programs.

California: The state will use funds to increase the number and availability of sewage pumpout and dump stations into both public and private boating facilities in coastal areas and to raise awareness. For inland areas, the state plans to build ten floating restrooms, four pumpout or dump station installations and four pumpout barges.

Connecticut: The grant award will allow the state to increase the number of pumpout and waste reception facilities in coastal areas, to enhance existing pumpout facilities and outreach. Also, the state plans to increase the number of facilities on Candlewood Lake.

Florida: The state plans to continue its goal to provide an additional 245 pumpout facilities in coastal areas and 54 in inland areas.

Georgia: The program funds will help contribute to facilities at the Victoria Landing Marina on Lake Allatoona.

Kentucky: The state plans to construct new pumpout facilities at Lake Cumberland and Lake Barkley.

Maine: In coastal areas, the state plans to install or upgrade ten pump-out stations and to provide operation and maintenance funds to marinas.

Maryland: Funds will be used to construct new pumpout facilities, upgrade existing facilities and to continue the state's educational efforts.

Massachusetts: The state plans to use the award for the operation and maintenance of 62 pumpout vessels, 45 shore side pumpout facilities, and fourteen dump stations. Program funds will also be used to purchase an engine for a pumpout vessel and outreach.

Michigan: The state plans to issue the award to local governments and private marina operators. The state will focus its efforts in the Great Lakes area.

Missouri: The state plans to provide pumpout facilities at three marinas. The pumpout facilities will provide services on Missouri's large lakes and rivers.

New Hampshire: The state plans to upgrade an older pumpout system, install a new pump-out facility at a public access site, and introduce a new mobile pumpout boat to the Hampton Harbor and Rye Harbor areas. The states plans to construct a pumpout facility on Lake Sunapee, to replace an existing dump station on Lake Winnisquam and to construct a dump station facility at a private marina on Lake Winnipesaukee.

New York: The state plans to increase the number of pumpout and dump stations available on New York State's coastal and inland waters to the maximum number identified in the state's plan.

Ohio: The state plans to install a pumpout dock at Middle Bass Park, to reprint clean vessel practices in the Ohio Boat Operators Guide and the Ohio Boating Education Course and to update available information on the location of pumpouts and dump stations.

Oklahoma: The program funds will help with the installation of a marine pumpout station at the Pioneer Cove Marina at Kaw Lake.

Oregon: Program funds will be used to construct one pumpout station, one dump station and two floating restrooms, operate and maintain 19 publicly owned pumpout facilities along the coast and continue its education program. The state also plans to construct one pumpout station, two dump stations and three floating restrooms in inland areas.

Pennsylvania: The state plans to construct three pump-out facilities and two dump stations, and upgrade two existing units in coastal areas and two in inland areas.

Tennessee: Program funds will be used to maintain a state grant program that assists local municipal and private marinas with the development of sewage pumpout facilities and fund its existing educational program.

Texas: Program funds will be used to construct six pumpout facilities in coastal areas and continue with outreach.

Washington: The State plans to expand the network of boat sewage disposal facilities throughout the State's coastal and inland areas.

Congress passed the Clean Vessel Act in 1992, which established a federal grant program administered by the Service, to help reduce pollution from vessel sewage discharges. Funding comes from the Sport Fish Restoration account, made up of revenues from excise taxes on fishing equipment, boats, and motorboat fuels. The Clean Vessel Act requires that pumpout stations in coastal environments receive funding preference, although proposals for inland facilities are also eligible for funding from the program. Federal funds can constitute up to 75 percent of all approved projects, with the remaining funds provided by the States or marinas. The Service has awarded more than $90 million to States for their Clean Vessel Act programs and efforts.

Raw or poorly treated sewage can spread disease, contaminate shellfish beds and lower oxygen levels in water. Waterborne diseases including hepatitis, typhoid and cholera can be transmitted by shellfish. Organic matter in sewage is decomposed in the water by bacteria. During this process, the bacteria use oxygen. As a result, sewage in the water may deplete the water's oxygen level, causing stress to fish and other aquatic animals.

Fore more information, please see http://federalaid.fws.gov/cva/cva.html.


The Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance number is 15.616.

State

Project Type

Clean Vessel Act Award

Alabama

Inland

$135,731

Alabama

Coastal

$82,987

Alaska

Inland

$256,800

Arizona

Inland

$134,330

Arkansas

Inland

$39,800

California

Inland

$950,000

California

Coastal

$1,091,548

Connecticut

Inland

$108,682

Connecticut

Coastal

$764,652

Florida

Inland

$915,375

Florida

Coastal

$1,550,694

Georgia

Inland

$48,849

Kentucky

Inland

$51,675

Maine

Coastal

$261,997

Maryland

Coastal

$602,000

Massachusetts

Coastal

$743,350

Michigan

Coastal

$60,000

Missouri

Inland

$36,000

New Hampshire

Inland

$20,170

New Hampshire
Coastal
$58,830

New York

Inland

$143,719

New York

Coastal

$355,916

Ohio
Coastal
$45,000
Oklahoma
Inland
$51,045

Oregon

Inland

$453,912

Oregon

Coastal

$332,433

Pennsylvania

Inland

$34,761

Pennsylvania

Coastal

$55,227

Tennessee

Inland

$430,000

Texas

Coastal

$150,000

Washington

Inland

$175,000

Washington

Coastal

$725,000

Total  
$10,865,483

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. The Service manages the 95-million-acre National Wildlife Refuge System, which encompasses 544 national wildlife refuges, thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas. It also operates 69 national fish hatcheries, 64 fishery resources offices and 81 ecological services field stations. The agency enforces federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat such as wetlands, and helps foreign governments with their conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Aid program, which distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to state fish and wildlife agencies.

 


For more information about the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, visit our home page at http://southeast.fws.gov/ or http://www.fws.gov/.



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