Fish & Wildlife Service Header





 












43 Southeast Refuges Named Important Bird Areas By American Bird Conservancy


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 18, 2003

Contact:
Tom MacKenzie, USFWS Southeast Region 404-679-7291, 678-296-6400 (cell)


The American Bird Conservancy today named 43 Southeast National Wildlife Refuges United States globally-Import ant Bird Areas in a new guide being announced today.

The National Wildlife Refuge System provides one third of this country’s globally-Important Bird Areas according to a new guide released today by the American Bird Conservancy. Of the total 508 areas the Conservancy designated, 160 are national wildlife refuges, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. An Important Bird Area provides habitat for birds either on a year-round basis or during seasonal migrations.

“In our most recent survey of hunting, fishing, and wildlife-associated recreation, we found that twenty- two percent of all Americans are birders,” said Service Director Steve Williams. “National wildlife refuges serve both people and birds by providing habitat for the species as well as places where people can enjoy watching and learning about birds.”

To receive an Important Bird Areas designation, an area must have a significant presence of one or more of the following: populations of endangered or threatened bird species; concentrations of migratory birds; populations of species with restricted ranges; and birds contained on the Partners in Flight watch list.

“The Southeast is well represented with more than 40 National Wildlife Refuges that have been received this Important Bird Area designation with truly spectacular bird-watching opportunities,” said Sam D. Hamilton, Southeast Regional Director for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Examples of bird species benefitting from these protected areas include the Black-crowned Night-Herons at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, the Pileated Woodpeckers at ACE Basin National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina, and endangered Whooping cranes at Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge, Florida.

To see a map with links by state to all 500 sites designated by American Bird Conservancy as Globally Important Bird Areas visit: http://www.abcbirds.org/iba/ibalist.htm

More than twenty other Important Bird Areas’s are found on lands managed by other Interior Department agencies such as the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management.

For more information on the National Wildlife Refuge System now celebrating its centennial anniversary, please visit http://www.refuges.fws.gov; To learn more about Important Bird Areas’s and the bird species dependant upon them, visit http://www.abcbirds.org.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. The Service manages the 95-million-acre National Wildlife Refuge System, which encompasses nearly 542 national wildlife refuges, thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas. It
also operates 69 national fish hatcheries, 64 fishery resource offices and 78 ecological services field stations. The agency enforces federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat such as wetlands, and helps foreign governments with their conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Aid program that distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to state fish and wildlife agencies. For more information on the Fish and Wildlife Service, see our Web site at http://www.fws.gov . For information on the Southeast Region, visit: http://southeast.fws.gov.


Southeast Region National Wildlife Refuges Designated as Important Bird Areas:

State

Refuge

AL

Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge

AR

Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge

AR

Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge

AR

White River National Wildlife Refuge

GA

Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge

GA

Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

GA

Wolf Island National Wildlife Refuge

FL

Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

FL

Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuge

FL

Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge

FL

Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge

FL

Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge

FL

Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge

FL

Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

FL

National Key Deer Refuge

FL

Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

FL

St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge

LA

Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge (Southeast Louisiana Refuges)

LA

Breton National Wildlife Refuge

LA

Catahoula National Wildlife Refuge

LA

Delta National Wildlife Refuge

LA

Sabine National Wildlife Refuge

LA

Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge

MS

Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge

MS

Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge

MS

Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge Complex

MS

Hillside National Wildlife Refuge

MS

Mathews Brake National Wildlife Refuge

MS

Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge

MS

Panther Swamp National Wildlife Refuges

NC

Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge

NC

Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge

NC

Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge

NC

Pocosin and Pungo Lakes National Wildlife Refuge

NC

Roanoke River National Wildlife Refuge

NC

Swanquarter National Wildlife Refuge

NC

Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge

SC

ACE Basin NWR

SC

Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge

SC

Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge

TN

Reelfoot Lake National Wildlife Refuge

TN

Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. The Service manages the 95-million-acre National Wildlife Refuge System, which encompasses 542 national wildlife refuges, thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas. It also operates 69 national fish hatcheries, 64 fishery resource offices and 81 ecological services field stations. The agency enforces federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat such as wetlands, and helps foreign governments with their conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Aid program that distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to state fish and wildlife agencies.

 

 


For more information about the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, visit our home page at http://southeast.fws.gov/ or http://www.fws.gov/.



NOTE: You can view our releases or subscribe to receive them -- via e-mail -- at the Service's Southeast Regional home page at http://southeast.fws.gov. Our national home page is at: http://news.fws.gov/newsreleases/.

Atlanta, GA 30345
Phone: 404/679-7289 Fax: 404/679-7286


| Home | Privacy Information | Site Map | Contact Site Administration | Got Fish & Wildlife Questions?