Inventory & Monitoring Network
Southeast Region

 

 

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Biotic Resources

Informed planning and resource management requires information about status, trends, and changes in fish, wildlife, plant populations, and their habitats. The National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) Inventory & Monitoring (I&M) Initiative and Southeast Region I&M Network efforts are focused on both biotic and abiotic resources.

Some of the current biotic efforts being conducted by the Southeast I&M Network, refuges, and partners include Amphibian Inventories, Aquatic Invasive Species Monitoring, Bird Monitoring, Freshwater Mussel Inventory, Mobile Acoustical Bat Monitoring, and Vegetation Monitoring.

 

Amphibian Inventories

There is a growing concern about the worldwide decline of amphibian populations, and the southeastern U.S. represents one of the world's most diverse regions for amphibians. Amphibians are commonly recognized as good indicators of ecosystem health and change due to their dependence on various wetland habitats and sensitivity to environmental stressors.

In 2013, the Southeast Region I&M Network partnered with the National Park Service Southeast Coast Network to pilot the amphibian community monitoring protocol on Roanoke River NWR. Visual encounter surveys that incorporated dip-net techniques were performed, and Automatic Recording Devices (ARDs) were deployed at 12 sampling locations. This ongoing pilot was performed to estimate time, cost, and work-load involved in performing amphibian community monitoring on refuges. The ARDs will be collected in June 2013, and the recordings of frog calls were scanned and identified with the Wildlife Acoustic's Song Scope program. A final report will be available in early 2014. To learn more about this pilot, please contact I&M Network terrestrial ecologist, Wendy Stanton.

 

Aquatic Invasive Species Monitoring

There are over 300 aquatic invasive species (plants and animals) documented in the Southeast with more introductions occurring every year. Aquatic invasive species (AIS) can greatly impact the ecology of native species occurring in these ecosystems.

Beginning in 2012 and continuing through 2013, the Southeast Region I&M Network collaborated with the Fisheries, Refuges, and Environmental Quality programs to perform fish community assessment work on Savannah NWR that included standard protocol development using multiple techniques to detect aquatic invasive species. Components of this work included early detection and rapid response, new technologies, and both internal and external education about AIS. This work builds on a previous study conducted at A.R.M. Loxahatchee NWR that included standard protocol development, early detection and rapid response techniques for AIS, and the development of eDNA markers for AIS species that are emerging threats to aquatic systems. To date, more than 80 km have been sampled in multiple seasons and varying tidal and water level conditions. Data are currently being analyzed, with final reports and presentations available in 2014.

For more information, please contact I&M Network aquatic ecologist, Theresa Thom, or the Regional AIS Coordinator, Jeffrey Herod.

 

Bird Monitoring

Many refuges were established to provide habitat for birds, and refuges are charged with managing, monitoring, and protecting these species. The Southeast Region I&M Network is working with refuges and other partners on numerous bird planning and monitoring activities. Some of the current efforts include IWMM surveys, Bird Responses to DFC protocol updates, and SEANET beached bird surveys.

  • Integrated Waterbird Management and Monitoring (IWMM) Initiative - The IWMM Initiative is a joint effort among conservation partners located along the Atlantic and Mississippi Flyways, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey, the states, Ducks Unlimited and other non-governmental agencies. The IWMM Initiative seeks to standardize and coordinate monitoring of migrating and wintering waterbirds and their habitats across the Atlantic and Mississippi flyways and to develop decision support tools informed by monitoring data to address management questions at local, regional, and flyway scales. Using an adaptive management framework, monitoring data is being used to continually learn and evaluate management and models at all three spatial scales. The Southeast Region I&M Network has been assisting with pilot data collection in the South Atlantic. This information is being used to validate the IWMM vegetation protocol which will be used to develop a decision support tool for land managers. For more information about IWMM, please contact the I&M Network Coordinator, Laurel Barnhill; I&M Network terrestrial ecologist, Wendy Stanton; or the North Carolina Migratory Bird project leader, John Stanton.
  • Monitoring Bird Response to Desired Forest Conditions (DFCs) in Forested Wetlands - Working with Migratory Birds and Lower Mississippi Valley Joint Venture (LMVJV), the Southeast Region I&M Network is working to adapt the methods for collecting vegetation data associated with bird point counts in forested wetlands. Migratory Birds and LMVJV staff have recently updated the bird point count methods to match the nationally approved Landbird Monitoring Protocol (Knutson et al. 2008), so this process will bring the vegetation data collection to the new U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protocol format standards. The methods for collecting vegetation data at point count sites in forested wetlands will soon be available. For more information, please contact the I&M Network plant ecologist, Tim Fotinos.
  • Seabird Ecological Assessment Network Beached Bird Surveys - The Seabird Ecological Assessment Network (SEANET) is a citizen science program conducting standardized beached bird monitoring on the Atlantic coast of the United States. These surveys provide baseline information about bird mortality and can help to detect mass mortality events due to oil spills, algal toxins, and disease outbreaks. In 2011, SEANET beached bird surveys were initiated in North Carolina by the Southeast Region I&M Network and North Carolina Migratory Birds Field Office, and 17 new routes were established. The surveys consist of walking a beach segment once or twice per month and collecting data on environmental conditions, beach debris, and both dead and live bird sightings. For more information about SEANET surveys, please contact the I&M Network terrestrial ecologist, Wendy Stanton, or the North Carolina Migratory Bird project leader, John Stanton.

 

Freshwater Mussel Inventory

Freshwater mussels are one of the most imperiled groups of animals in North America, and approximately 90% of the over 300 species are found in the southeastern United States. Freshwater mussels are an important component of aquatic ecosystems and are indicator species for assessing the health of freshwater systems.

This September, the Southeast Region I&M Network collaborated with Southwest Region I&M, Fisheries, and Ecological Services to conduct a freshwater mussel inventory at Pond Creek NWR. The Little River in southwestern Arkansas is known for having a high diversity of freshwater mussels including endangered (Ouachita Rock Pocketbook, Arkansia wheeleri), candidate (Rabbitsfoot, Quadrula cylindrica), and other rare species. The team assessed approximately 36 river miles during the 10-day survey, resulting in delineation of several dozen mussel beds. Thirty-four mussel species were documented during this survey, including one live Ouachita rock pocketbook.

This inventory project provided species composition and abundance data for freshwater mussels in the Little River occurring within and adjacent to the refuge. These data will serve as a baseline for the refuge and provide vital information about listed species including potential reintroduction and rearing sites for the Ouachita Rock Pocketbook. For more information about the Pond River NWR freshwater mussel inventory, please contact the I&M Network plant ecologist, Tim Fotinos, or I&M Network aquatic ecologist, Lee Holt.

 

Mobile Acoustical Bat Monitoring

Bats are integral to sustaining biodiversity of both simple and complex ecosystems in the eastern United States. Bats have been specifically identified as species of concern in many National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation and Habitat Management Plans and are otherwise recognized as a species group of interest on many refuge lands. Recent recognition of landscape level threats to bat populations and refuge-scale needs for baseline information on bat abundance and distribution has prompted refuges to start coordinated acoustical monitoring of bats in the Southeast.

Beginning in 2012, the Southeast Region I&M Network started an unprecedented coordinated monitoring effort to provide baseline inventories of bat species on refuges and contribute to assessment of long-term changes in Southeastern bat populations. The mobile acoustical bat monitoring (MABM) project includes survey transects at:

Each year from June to July, stations use Anabat SD2 detectors (mobile data logger) to log ultrasonic bat echolocation data collected via a roof-mounted microphone. Bat calls will be classified and summarized by species using modeling software which is currently undergoing additional beta testing for verification and validation of accuracy.

For more information about the MABM project, please contact I&M Network terrestrial ecologist, David Richardson or I&M Network data manager, Kristine Evans. Also, please view the 2012 MABM Regional Summary Report (543KB)PDF icon.

 

Vegetation Assessment and Monitoring

Plant communities face numerous threats from non-native species invasion to human development to climate change. It is important to monitor and evaluate changes in plant community composition over time. Some of the current efforts include Carolina Vegetation Survey plot establishment and Historic Vegetation Assessments.

  • RSET Station Vegetation Monitoring - In the Summer 2013, the Southeast Region I&M Network performed vegetation monitoring in association with rod surface elevation table (RSET) sites on coastal refuges within the South Atlantic geography. During this baseline vegetation survey, permanent plots were established at all RSET sites. Using the Carolina Vegetation Survey (CVS) Level 5 protocol, staff set up three 10X10 meter plots per RSET site to determine compositional richness (i.e. number of species) across multiple spatial scales (smallest scale = 0.01 m²; largest scale = 100 m²), document tree and shrub density, and describe abiotic conditions within the plot. All of the data were archived in a standard format, entered into the CVS database, and will be made available to refuge staff and partners in Spring 2014. I&M Network and refuge staff worked in cypress-gum swamp forests, pocosins, oligohaline marsh, and salt marsh wetlands documenting over 450 species occurrences. For more information, please contact I&M Network botanist, Forbes Boyle, or I&M coastal ecologist, Nicole Rankin.
  • Historic Vegetation Assessment - Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge is currently developing a new Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) and Habitat Management Plan (HMP) for the refuge. The Southeast Region I&M Network is supporting this development by providing data to aid in defining historic habitat condition. Two types of data were provided: 1) historic accounts of vegetation communities on the refuge documented in primary and gray literature and 2) spatial data from models predicting vegetation community distributions prior to major European settlement and logging activities. Spatial data from LANDFIRE were provided to the refuge and tested by a GIS-based model, developed by Southeast Region I&M Network staff, using refuge specific, historic tree data from 1830 county land surveys to confirm local applicability of the regional level data. In May 2013, the final vegetation assessment report (1.2MB) PDF icon was completed and provided to the refuge. For more information about this project, please contact I&M Network plant ecologist, Tim Fotinos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Southern cricket frog collected from Roanoke River NWR, NC, Image Credit: Briana Smrekar/NPS

Southern cricket frog collected from Roanoke River NWR, NC.
Image Credit: Briana Smrekar/NPS.

 

Fish sampling at Savannah NWR., Image Credit: Theresa Thom/USFWS

Fish sampling at Savannah NWR.
Image Credit: Theresa Thom/USFWS.

 

Beggar's Tick was documented during IWMM vegetation survey, Pocosin Lakes NWR, NC. Image Credit: Wendy Stantonn.

Beggar's Tick was documented during IWMM vegetation survey, Pocosin Lakes NWR, NC. Image Credit: Wendy Stanton.

Bottomland hardwood forest, Tensas NWR, LA. Image Credit: Kelly Purkey/USFWS

Bottomland hardwood forest,
Tensas NWR, LA.
Image Credit: Kelly Purkey/USFWS.

Northern Gannet observed during beached bird survey on Pea Island NWR, NC Image Credit: Wendy Stanton/USFWS

Northern Gannet observed during SEANET survey on Pea Island NWR, NC. Image Credit: Wendy Stanton/USFWS.

 

 

Sorting freshwater mussels, Pond Creek NWR. Image Credit: Janet Ertel/USFWS

Sorting freshwater mussels, Pond Creek NWR. Image Credit: Janet Ertel/USFWS.

 

 

Rafinesque's big-eared bat, Image Credit: Gary Peeples/USFWS

Rafinesque's big-eared bat,
Image Credit: Gary Peeples/USFWS.

Stations implementing the MABM, Image Credit: USFWS

Map of MABM stations,
Image Credit: USFWS.

 

RSET station vegetation monitoring at Pinckney Island NWR, SC. Image Credit: Forbes Boyle/USFWS.

RSET station vegetation monitoring at
Pinckney Island NWR, SC.
Image Credit: Forbes Boyle/USFWS.

Carolina vegetation survey at Roanoke River NWR, NC. Image Credit: Forbes Boyle/USFWS.

Collecting soil samples at
Roanoke River NWR, NC.
Image Credit: Forbes Boyle/USFWS.

Last updated: November 26, 2013