Science Excellence
Conserving the Nature of America
Scientific Journals
JFMW logo and NAF logo

Resources for Authors and Reviewers

Authors:

Dual Publication
As detailed in the Guide for Authors, if any portion of a manuscript has been published or reported elsewhere, all similarities between information in the manuscript and the previous publications must be detailed in the manuscript and properly cited. We also subscribe to the standards articulated by Kendall in “Dual Publication of Scientific Information”, Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 110:573-574 (1981). Provided here with permission from the American Fisheries Society.

Fish Name Spellchecker
Please use the American Fisheries Society complimentary Fish Name Spellchecker as needed. It is based on the 2004 Sixth Edition of the AFS book Common and Scientific Names of Fishes from the United States, Canada, and Mexico—all common and scientific names in the Sixth Edition are included.

Writing References
Richard S. provides many good suggestions including numerous references for authors in “Several Books to Read and Thereby Delay Writing Your Thesis”, Fisheries 34:80-82 (2009). Provided here with permission from the American Fisheries Society.

Style Guides and Reference Literature
Our standard for word definition and spelling is Webster’s Third New International Dictionary, as updated by the latest edition (currently 11th) of Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary.

For taxonomic and vernacular names of North American fish species, we follow the American Fisheries Society’s most recent edition of Common and Scientific Names of Fishes from the United States, Canada, and Mexico (Special Publication 29). The American Fisheries Society Fish Name Spellchecker is a useful tool for providing current common and scientific names. For other fish and invertebrate species, we encourage readers to follow the Society’s companion publications: World Fishes Important to North Americans (Special Publication 21), and Common and Scientific Names of Aquatic Invertebrates from the United States and Canada (Mollusks, 2nd edition; Crustaceans, and Cnidaria and Ctenophora are currently available in the latter series).

For analyses of fish population dynamics, we prefer the notation as used by W.E. Ricker in his Computation and Interpretation of Biological Statistics of Fish Populations (Fisheries Research Board of Canada Bulletin 191, 1975). However, all such symbolism should be defined anew in each manuscript.

Our standards for chemical names are the current editions of the Merck Index (Merck & Co., Rahway, New Jersey) and Enzyme Nomenclature (Academic Press, San Diego, California). Geneticists should use the “Gene Nomenclature for Protein-Coding Loci in Fish” by J. B. Shaklee et al. (Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 119:2–15, 1990). Provided here with permission from the Transactions of the American Fisheries Society.

As general references for birds, use the most current edition (7th) of The American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list (i.e., 1998 plus 49th supplement from 2008) and periodic supplements published in Auk. For mammals, use either Whitaker (1996) National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mammals or Wilson and Reeder (2005) Mammal Species of the World, 3rd edition. There is no single reference for plants in North America; cite the most widely accepted regional flora reference (e.g., in northwestern states, Hitchcock and Cronquist [1973]).

As a general reference for amphibians and reptiles, follow Crother (2008; Herpetological Circular 37, Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles) for species from North America.

As a general reference for insects, use the current Entomological Society of America (ESA) Common Names of Insects and Related Organisms online database or names approved by the ESA Common Names Committee.

As a general reference for bacteria, follow the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes (formerly the International Committee on Systematic Bacteriology [ICSB]).

For categories not specifically addressed, follow the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN) or International Code of Botanical Nomenclature.

In addition, several other style manuals provide useful guidance for the preparation of manuscripts, especially the latest edition of Scientific Style and Format, 7th edition (Council of Science Editors, Chicago). The Elements of Style by Strunk and White (Macmillan, New York) continues to be an excellent guide to English usage.

Reviewers:

Reviewer References
DeVries et al. provide an excellent discussion of the peer review process in "Exploring the Peer Review Process: What Is It, Does It Work, and Can It Be Improved", Fisheries 34: 270-279 (2009). Provided here with permission from the American Fisheries Society.

Volunteer as a Reviewer
Register here to complete your online profile for the Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management and North American Fauna. Once there, start with the “Register Here” link below the login and be sure to record your desire to serve as a reviewer by answering “yes” to the question in the form: “Will you consider being a Reviewer for this journal?”. Registering on this Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management site will also make you available as a reviewer for North American Fauna.

Specific Reviewer Instructions
Specific instructions for Reviewers of manuscripts for the Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management and North American Fauna can be found here.

All cited resources are available via the NCTC Conservation Library.

temp copy for image placement

temp copy for image placement

temp copy for image placement

butterfly
Last updated: February 6, 2013
February 6, 2013