Public Advisory

Service Reopens Public Comment Period for Proposal to List the Western Yellow-Billed Cuckoo as a Threatened Species

Comments Accepted through April 25, 2014

April 9, 2014

Media Contacts:
Robert Moler, (916) 414 6606 robert_moler@fws.gov (California and Nevada)
Brent Lawrence, (503) 807-4886 brent_lawrence@fws.gov (Washington, Idaho, and Oregon)
Steve Segin, (303) 236-4578 robert_segin@fws.gov (Montana, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado)
Tom Buckley, (505) 248-6455 Tom_buckley@fws.gov (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas)

Sacramento, CA – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) will reopen the public comment period on April 10, 2014 for 15 days for the proposal to list the western distinct population segment of the yellow-billed cuckoo as a Threatened Species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

On October 3, 2013, the Service proposed to list the western yellow-billed cuckoo in the western United States, Canada, and Mexico. In the U.S., the western yellow-billed cuckoo is known to occur in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.

The Service will accept comments through April 25, 2014 on the proposed rule. Comments may be submitted online at the Federal eRulemaking Portal at http://www.regulations.gov, docket number FWS–R8–ES–2013-0104. Comments can also be sent by U.S. mail to:
Public Comments Processing
Attn: FWS–R8–ES–2013-0104
Division of Policy and Directives Management
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
4401 N. Fairfax Drive, MS 2042-PDM
Arlington, VA 22203

The Service seeks information regarding any threats to the species and regulations that may address those threats. More information about the proposal and a detailed outline of the information that the Service is specifically seeking can be found on the Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office’s website at: http://www.fws.gov/sacramento/outreach/Public-Advisories/WesternYellow-BilledCuckoo/outreach_PA_Western-Yellow-Billed-Cuckoo.htm.

Comments previously submitted during the initial public comment period need not be resubmitted.

The western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) is a neotropical migrant bird that winters in South America and breeds in western North America. The yellow-billed cuckoo is insectivorous and lives in riparian woodlands.

While the yellow-billed cuckoo is common east of the Continental Divide, biologists estimate that more than 90 percent of the bird's riparian habitat in the West has been lost or degraded. Threats to the western distinct population segment include loss of riparian habitat and habitat fragmentation as a result of conversion to agriculture, dams and river flow management, bank protection, overgrazing, and competition from exotic plants.


Service Reopens Public Comment Period for Proposal to List the Western Yellow-Billed Cuckoo as a Threatened Species

Comments Accepted through February 24, 2014

December 24, 2013

Media Contact:
Sarah Swenty, Sarah_Swenty@fws.gov, (530) 665-3310
Brent Lawrence, Brent_Lawrence@fws.gov, (503) 807-4886 -(Washington, Idaho, and Oregon)
Steve Segin, Robert_Segin@fws.gov, (303) 236-4578 - (Montana, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado)
Tom Buckley, Tom_Buckley@fws.gov, (505) 248-6455 - (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas)

Sacramento, Calif – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is reopening the public comment period for 60 days for the proposal to list the western distinct population segment of the yellow-billed cuckoo as a Threatened Species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

On October 3, 2013, the Service proposed to list the western yellow-billed cuckoo in the western United States, Canada, and Mexico. In the U.S., the western yellow-billed cuckoo is known to occur in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. The initial public comment period for the proposal ended on December 2, 2013.

"We are reopening the public comment period to ensure the public has adequate opportunity to submit comments on this proposal,” said Jennifer Norris, Field Supervisor for the Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office. “Public comments help ensure that any final decision made by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reflects all of the best science and information available."

The Service will accept comments through February 24, 2014 on the proposed rule. Comments may be submitted online at the Federal eRulemaking Portal at http://www.regulations.gov, docket number FWS–R8–ES–2013-0104. Comments can also be sent by U.S. mail to:
Public Comments Processing
Attn: FWS–R8–ES–2013-0104
Division of Policy and Directives Management
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
4401 N. Fairfax Drive, MS 2042-PDM
Arlington, VA 22203

The Service seeks information regarding any threats to the species and regulations that may address those threats. More information about the proposal and a detailed outline of the information that the Service is specifically seeking can be found here on our website.

Comments previously submitted during the initial public comment period need not be resubmitted

The western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) is a neotropical migrant bird that winters in South America and breeds in western North America. The yellow-billed cuckoo is insectivorous and lives in riparian woodlands.

While the yellow-billed cuckoo is common east of the Continental Divide, biologists estimate that more than 90 percent of the bird's riparian habitat in the West has been lost or degraded. Threats to the western distinct population segment include loss of riparian habitat and habitat fragmentation as a result of conversion to agriculture, dams and river flow management, bank protection, overgrazing, and competition from exotic plants.


Western Yellow-Billed Cuckoo Proposed for Federal Protections

Service Seeks Public Comments by December 2, 2013

October 17, 2013

Media Contacts:
Sarah Swenty, (530) 665-3310; sarah_swenty@fws.gov (California and Nevada)
Brent Lawrence, (503) 807-4886; brent_lawrence@fws.gov (Washington, Idaho, and Oregon)
Steve Segin, (303) 236-4578; robert_segin@fws.gov (Montana, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado)
Tom Buckley, (505) 248-6455; Tom_buckley@fws.gov (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas)

Sacramento-- On October 3, 2013, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) proposed to list the western distinct population segment (DPS) of the yellow-billed cuckoo as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in the western United States, Canada, and Mexico. In the U.S., the western yellow-billed cuckoo is known to occur in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.

“The western yellow-billed cuckoo is distinct from populations in the east and has different habitat requirements,” said Jennifer Norris, Field Supervisor for the Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Service. “Populations of western yellow-billed cuckoo, and their nesting habitat along rivers and streams, have been declining over the last few decades. The Service is asking the public to review our proposal to list the western yellow-billed cuckoo as a threatened species and submit comments. We need all of the best available scientific information to help us make a final decision that most effectively protects the species.”

The Service is looking for information concerning the western yellow-billed cuckoo’s biology and habitat, threats to the species, and current efforts to protect the bird.

Comments for the proposal to list the western yellow-billed cukoo as a threatened species will be accepted through December 2, 2013. Comments may be submitted online at the Federal eRulemaking Portal at www.regulations.gov. The Docket Number for the proposed listing rule is FWS–R8–ES–2013-0104. Comments can also be sent by U.S. mail to:

Public Comments Processing
Attn: FWS–R8–ES–2013-0104
Division of Policy and Directives Management
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
4401 N. Fairfax Drive, MS 2042-PDM
Arlington, VA 22203

The western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) is a neotropical migrant bird that winters in South America and breeds in western North America. The yellow-billed cuckoo is an insectivorous bird that lives in riparian woodlands.

While the yellow-billed cuckoo is common east of the Continental Divide, biologists estimate that more than 90 percent of the bird's riparian habitat in the West has been lost or degraded. The listing proposal, which is based on the best scientific data available, cites threats from loss of riparian habitat and habitat fragmentation as a result of conversion to agriculture, dams and river flow management, bank protection, overgrazing, and competition from exotic plants as key facto-rs in the decline of the western yellow-billed cuckoo.

The Service was petitioned to add the western yellow-billed cuckoo to the federal list of threatened or endangered species in 1998. In a review of the status of the species, the Service found that the yellow-billed cuckoo populations west of the Continental Divide in the United States was a DPS and added the species to the candidate list in 2001. The Service’s announcement today officially proposes to list the western yellow-billed cuckoo as a threatened species.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov/cno. Connect with our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/usfwspacificsouthwest, follow our tweets at twitter.com/USFWSPacSWest, watch our YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/usfws and download photos from our Flickr page at www.flickr.com/photos/usfws_pacificsw


The Western Yellow Billed Cuckoo

Media Contacts:
Media Contact:  Robert Moler, (916) 414-6606; robert_moler@fws.gov

Western Yellow-Billed Cuckoo

Photo: Mark Dettling

The yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) is a neotropical migrant bird that winters in South America and breeds in western North America.   Adult yellow-billed cuckoos have moderate to heavy bills, somewhat elongated bodies and a narrow yellow ring of colored bare skin around the eye.  The plumage is loose and grayish-brown above and white below, with reddish primary flight feathers.  The tail feathers are boldly patterned with black and white below.  They are a medium-sized bird about 12 inches in length, and weigh about 2 ounces.  The species has a slender, long-tailed profile, with a fairly stout and slightly down-curved bill, which is blue-black with yellow on the basal half of the lower mandible.  The legs are short and bluish-gray.

The western yellow-billed cuckoo appears to be distinct from other yellow-billed cuckoos based on physical, biological, ecological and behavioral factors.  During breeding season, the western yellow-billed cuckoos are separated from other yellow-billed cuckoo populations.  Western yellow-billed cuckoos prefer isolated wooded riparian corridors surrounded by extensive arid uplands and, the western yellow-billed cuckoos are larger in size, migrate about a month earlier to their breeding grounds, and produce larger eggs with thicker shells.