U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service logo A Unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System
Banner graphic displaying the Fish & Wildlife Service logo and National Wildlife Refuge System tagline

Quillayute Needles
National Wildlife Refuge


Along 100 miles of Washington's Pacific coast
from Flattery Rocks south to Copalis Beach in
Jefferson County, WA   
E-mail: Kevin_Ryan@fws.gov
Phone Number: 360-457-8451
Visit the Refuge's Web Site:
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Quillayute_Needles/
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  Recreation and Education Opportunities

Interpretation
Interpretive panels at Lake Ozette, Rialto Beach, Second Beach, Ruby Beach, and Kalalock give information about the islands. Olympic National Park provides access to 50 miles of beaches with views of the islands.


Leave No Trace
Leave No Trace is a national educational program to inform visitors about reducing the damage caused by outdoor activities, particularly non-motorized recreation. Leave No Trace principles and practices are based on an abiding respect for the natural world and our fellow wildland visitors. We can act on behalf of the places and wildlife that inspire us by adopting the skills and ethics that enable us to Leave No Trace.

1. Plan ahead and prepare.
2. Travel on durable surfaces.
3. Dispose of waste properly.
4. Leave what you find.
5. Respect wildlife.
6. Be considerate of other visitors.

For more information on Leave No Trace, visit the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics Web site. (http://www.lnt.org)

Wildlife Observation
Dozens of seabird species (murres, puffins, cormorants, gulls, auklets, petrels, oystercatchers) breed on these fragments of earth and thousands of migratory birds use them as rest stops. The heads of numerous harbor and fur seals, northern and California sea lions, and even whales (including rights, grays, and humpbacks) take turns breaking through the surface of the surrounding water. Sea otters' pleasant faces can often be seen bobbing playfully among the kelp beds.


Leave No Trace
Leave No Trace is a national educational program to inform visitors about reducing the damage caused by outdoor activities, particularly non-motorized recreation. Leave No Trace principles and practices are based on an abiding respect for the natural world and our fellow wildland visitors. We can act on behalf of the places and wildlife that inspire us by adopting the skills and ethics that enable us to Leave No Trace.

1. Plan ahead and prepare.
2. Travel and camp on durable surfaces.
3. Dispose of waste properly.
4. Leave what you find.
5. Respect wildlife.
6. Be considerate of other visitors.

For more information on Leave No Trace, visit the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics Web site.

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