U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service logo A Unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System
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Moapa Valley
National Wildlife Refuge


9 miles east of Glendale in
Clark County, NV   
E-mail:
Phone Number: 702-515-5450
Visit the Refuge's Web Site:
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/moapa_valley/
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  Overview
Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge
The Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge was established on September 10, 1979, to secure habitat for the endangered Moapa dace. This small fish, the sole member of the genus Moapa, is endemic to the thermal springs and streams of the upper Muddy River system. Dace populations have declined due to habitat destruction and the introduction of nonnative fish species.

This modest Refuge--116 acres--located in Clark County, Nevada, 60 miles north of Las Vegas, is critical to prevent extinction of the Moapa dace. Dace habitat on the refuge consists of stream channels supported by three thermal spring complexes. Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge is a unit of the Desert National Wildlife Refuge Complex.


Getting There . . .
Due to its small size and fragile habitats, the refuge is only open to the general public on Fridays through Sundays, from Labor Day weekend to Memorial Day weekend (closed for the summer). Weekday visits -- especially for groups -- are scheduled on request. Situated near Interstate 15 and Nevada State Route 168, the towns of Moapa and Glendale are the closest to the refuge.

From Las Vegas, Nevada: drive north on Interstate 15 to the Moapa/Glendale exit (#90). Go straight (northwest) on State Route 168 for 7.4 miles to Warm Springs Road. Turn left (southwest) on Warm Springs Road and drive for 1.4 more miles. The refuge is on your left.

From St. George, Utah or Mesquite, Nevada: drive south on Interstate 15 to the Glendale/Moapa exit (#91). Turn left (southwest) onto E. Glendale Blvd. Merge/turn right (northwest) onto Highway 168 for 7.4 miles to Warm Springs Road. Turn left (southwest) on Warm Springs Road and drive for 1.4 more miles. The refuge is on your left.

From Alamo, Caliente, or Ely, Nevada: drive south on Interstate 93 to the intersection with State Route 168. Turn left (east) onto State Route 168 and drive for 15.5 miles to Warm Springs Road. Turn right (southeast) on Warm Springs Road and drive for 1.8 more miles. The refuge is on your right.

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Wildlife and Habitat

The Moapa Valley National Wildlife was established to protect and enhance populations of endangered Moapa dace. The thermal springs and streams of the upper Muddy River system also supports an assemblage of endemic aquatic species found nowhere else, including the Moapa White River springfish, Moapa pebblesnail, Moapa Warm Springs riffle beetle, Moapa riffle beetle, and Moapa naucorid. Several other aquatic invertebrates also occur in the upper Muddy River system as well as other thermal spring systems, including the Moapa Valley pyrg, grated tryonia, Pahranagat naucorid, Western naucorid, and Warm Springs crawling beetle.

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History
For thousands of years, the Nuwuvi have been part of the landscape now called Moapa Valley. Nuwuvi villages originally stretched from the Warm Springs area to the Virgin River. Here the people grew corn, sunflowers, and other crops in the floodplain nourished by the valley's springs, and their communities thrived with minimal impacts to wildlife before European Americans arrived.

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    Note
The refuge is closed to the public from Memorial Day to Labor Day.




Recreation and Education Opportunities
Environmental Education
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Management Activities
Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Goals and Guiding Principles include:

1. Protect and restore, when possible, healthy populations of endemic and special-status species, such as the endangered Moapa dace, within the Muddy River headwaters.

2. Local communities and others enjoy and learn about the resources of Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge and participate in its restoration.

Management tools include: Endangered species restoration/management Water level/water rights/water quality Law enforcement Research Education/interpretation Volunteer/student intern program