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Umbagog
National Wildlife Refuge


Fall on Umbagog Lake
2756 Dam Road (Physical Address)
P.O. Box 240 (Mailing Address)
Errol, NH   03579 - 0240
E-mail: lakeumbagog@fws.gov
Phone Number: 603-482.3415
Visit the Refuge's Web Site:
http://www.fws.gov/northeast/lakeumbagog
Umbagog Lake in Fall (Refuge Staff Photo)
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  Overview
Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge
Located in Coos County New Hampshire and Oxford County Maine, Lake Umbagog refuge is a northern treasure in the National Wildlife Refuge System. The diversity of exceptional habitats provides excellent breeding and foraging areas for migratory birds, endangered species, resident wildlife, and rare plants. The refuge protects over 20,500 acres of wetland and forested upland habitat along Umbagog Lake.


Getting There . . .
NORTH FROM CT: I-91N through CT, MA and VT. Exit I-91 at St. Johnsbury, VT (Exit 21) to Rte 2E. Rte 2E into Lancaster, NH. Left onto Rte 3N at the "Y". Rte 3N to Route 110 (right onto Route 110 in Groveton, NH toward Stark, NH). Rte 110 to Rte 110A near Milan, NH--watch for this left turn. Rte 110A to Rte 16N (left turn onto 16N). Rte 16N to Rte 26E(right turn at intersection Rtes 16 & 26). Rte 26E to Rte 16N again (through town about 1/4 mile) Left onto Rte 16N at Eames Garage--also known as Dam Road. Refuge HQ is 5.5 miles up Rte 16N (2756 Dam Road) on right. Please park rental or Government vehicles across the street.

NORTH FROM BOSTON, MA/MANCHESTER, NH: I-93N through Franconia Notch, NH. From Franconia Notch, Exit 35 toward Twin Mountain, NH--Rte 3N. Drive through Twin Mountain on toward Whitefield, NH. Right on Rte 115. Rte 115 to U.S. Rte 2E. Right onto U.S. Rte 2E toward Gorham, NH. In Gorham, left at the traffic light onto Rte 16N. Rte 16N to Errol, NH (approximately 35 miles). Rte 16N to Rte 26E(right turn at intersection of Rtes 16 & 26). Rte 26E to Rte 16N again (through town about 1/4 mile) Left onto Rte 16N at Eames Garage--also known as Dam Road. Refuge HQ is 5.5 miles up Rte 16N (2756 Dam Road) on right. Please park rental or Government vehicles across the street.

WEST FROM PORTLAND, ME JETPORT: West on Airport Access road Left to I-95N (ME Turnpike North) toward Lewiston/Augusta. Merge onto I-495N(Portions toll) Exit 11 toward Gray, ME. Keep right at the ramp fork. Merge onto US Rte 202. Left onto ME 26. Slight left onto Railroad St. Sharp right onto US Rte 2. Left onto Rte 26. Rte 26 to Errol, NH (approx. 25 miles). Right onto Rte 16N at Eames Garage, also known as Dam road. Refuge HQ is 5.5 miles up Rte 16N (2756 Dam Road) on right. Please park rental or Government vehicles across the street.


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Wildlife and Habitat

Lake Umbagog NWR provides long-term conservation to important wetland and upland wildlife habitat for migratory birds and endangered species. The refuge provides management and enhancement of habitat for wildlife populations, thereby contributing to biological diversity, and provides environmental education opportunities and wildlife-oriented public uses.

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History
UMBAGOG (pronounced Um-BAY-gog) is a Native American word which translates to "clear water." The habitat and abundant wildlife found around Umbagog Lake, have long been recognized as special and important--by Anasagunticook Native Americans, who hunted, trapped and traded around the lake and its rivers, and to European settlers, who brought farming and logging to the area. The glacial geology, northern climate and the meandering and seasonally flooding Magalloway and Androscoggin Rivers created a unique and richly diverse environment.

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    Note
The refuge is home to wandering moose. They are prevalent year-round but most active in spring through fall. Moose are large and unpredictable animals. Use caution when viewing them along roadsides. A cow with calves becomes very protective and may charge if approached by humans. They do not hesitate to cross roads in front of traffic. At times moose are extremely hard to see. Their dark fur makes them nearly invisible, so it's important to drive cautiously at night. Please do not stop in the middle of the road to view moose. Pull over to the side to avoid causing accidents.

Learn more about these crepuscular mammals in the wildlife category of our website.

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Recreation and Education Opportunities
Fishing
Hunting
Photography
Wildlife Observation
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Management Activities
The refuge protects more than 20,500 acres under Service management. In addition, the State of New Hampshire has acquired more than 1,000 acres and the state of Maine protects an additional 1,600 acres. This combination of ownerships and easements protects much of the Umbagog Lake shoreline in New Hampshire and Maine as well as significant lengths of shoreline along the Androscoggin and Magalloway Rivers.

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