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Carlton Pond
Waterfowl Production Area


A quiet pond surrounded by peat bog, farm fields and upland forest.
P.O. Box 1735
9 Water Street
Rockland, ME   04841
E-mail: Michael_Langlois@fws.gov
Phone Number: 207-594-0600, ext. 3
Visit the Refuge's Web Site:
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/carlton_pond_wpa/
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  Overview
Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area
Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area is a 1,055-acre manmade pond and wetland located in the town of Troy in Waldo County. The pond is formed by an earthen dam which backs up Carlton Brook. The area was acquired by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1966 to protect the waterfowl and other wildlife associated with this area in Central Maine.

The original dam at Carlton Pond was a rock structure built in 1850 to provide water power for a sawmill operation. In 1972, the Fish and Wildlife Service reconstructed the dam to maintain the integrity of the structure and to assure continued maintenance of the open water, marsh, and wetland areas created by the original dam. A natural overflow near the structure provides an additional escape route for high water thereby affording extra protection for the dam and control structures. A right-of-way provides access to the dam for maintenance and public use.

Carlton Pond is one of the few areas in the state which provides nesting habitat for black terns, which are on the endangered species list maintained by the State of Maine. State and federal non-game biologists and researchers have been monitoring black tern use of Carlton Pond WPA and other areas for several years in an attempt to better determine the species' population status.

Carlton Pond WPA has historically provided good nesting habitat for waterfowl and other birds. To date, 33 bird species have been observed using refuge lands and waters. Many bird species that use Carlton Pond have been listed by the Partners-in-Flight organization as species that are declining. Slender Blue Flag, a species listed as Threatened by the State of Maine, has been sighted at Carlton Pond.


Getting There . . .
Carlton Pond WPA is a satellite refuge managed by the staff of Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. To get to Carlton Pond, turn east from U.S. 202 in Troy, Maine onto Maine Route 220. Follow Route 220 for about three miles until Bog Road is seen on your right. Bog Road crosses over Carlton Pond after about ½ mile. A small parking area exists on the right at this point.

The refuge headquarters is located in Rockland, Maine. Follow U.S. Route 1 to the intersection with route 73 in downtown Rockland. Turn south on to route 73 for ¼ mile then turn left onto Water Street. The office is a large white building on your right. Directions to all refuge units may be obtained at the headquarters.


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Wildlife and Habitat

Carlton Pond WPA protects peat bog habitat and pond habitat which are used by Black Terns, a species listed as endangered in Maine.

Much of Carlton Pond is water created by an earthen dam. The water is surrounded by peat bog habitat with some upland forest.

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History
The history of Carlton Pond is largely unknown, but dates back to the construction of the first rock dam around 1850, which powered a saw mill.

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Management Activities
Refuge employees and volunteers conduct surveys of refuge plants and wildlife on an annual basis in an effort to determine species present and to monitor the status of known plant and animal populations. Specific surveys include those for frogs, toads and salamanders (anurans), marsh birds, and American woodcock. Regular plant surveys are also conducted on refuge lands. Information collected is entered into national databases and assists in management of these species on a national level.