U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service logo A Unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System
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Logan Cave
National Wildlife Refuge


10448 Holla Bend Road
Dardanelle, AR   72834
E-mail: hollabend@fws.gov
Phone Number: 479-229-4300
Visit the Refuge's Web Site:
http://www.fws.gov/hollabend/logancave/
A spring-fed stream flows through the entire length of Logan Cave, providing a unique ecosystem for its
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  Overview
Logan Cave National Wildlife Refuge
Logan Cave NWR in Benton County, Arkansas became the 455th National Wildlife Refuge on March 14, 1989 under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. This 123-acre Ozark Mountain refuge, which includes a limestone-solution cave, is located 20 miles west of Fayetteville, Arkansas and approximately 2 miles north of U.S. Highway #412.

The Logan Cave area has a very diverse habitat which includes representatives of several Ozark Mountain types: oak-hickory forest, grassland, shrubland, floodplain, marshland, bottomland hardwood, upland deciduous, and a small prairie. The ecology of the cave has been described as the highest quality cave habitat in the entire Ozark region. A spring-fed stream, with an average water flow of 5 million gallons/day, extends the entire length of the cave. This stream, fed by small springs that emanate from the cave, once supplied water to the Logan community, a fish hatchery and 49 fish ponds. Today, the spring forms a small stream which flows into the Osage Creek, a major tributary of the Illinois River. Geological features of the cave distinctly exhibit how Ozark limestone-solution caves are formed. Many fossil marine species are present in the cave, evidence that the region was once covered by an ocean. Extensive deposits of fine alluvial clays of homogenous texture border the stream in some areas.

The primary objectives of Logan Cave NWR are to properly administer, preserve, and develop the tract for protection of a unique cave ecosystem that provides essential habitat for the endangered gray bat, endangered Ozark cave crayfish, the threatened Ozark cavefish, and other significant cavedwelling wildlife species. Gray bats use the cave in the spring and summer as a maternity site and the Ozark cave crayfish is known only to exist in Logan Cave and one other site.


Getting There . . .
Because of intolerable disturbances to the gray bats and the cave's other protected species, public use of Logan Cave NWR is prohibited. Entrance into the cave by Fish and Wildife Service personnel is restricted and all entry is prohibited from March through September to protect the gray bat maternity colony from disturbance.

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Wildlife and Habitat

Logan Cave is a large limestone-solution cave with approximately 1½ miles of charted passageways. The three ecological classification types (tunnel, seepage, and sinkhole) are present in different sections of the cave. The cave's internal temperature is a constant 55oF.

The sinkhole and spring entrances are the only two known entry points. The sinkhole consists of a funnel-shaped depression about 50 feet in diameter on a forested hillside; the spring entrance is located on a hillside under an overhang rock bluff.

The cave's passageway is relatively narrow with a low ceiling. In some areas, the ceiling gradually declines leaving only a tiny crawl space.

About halfway through the cave is an area where the endangered gray bats congregate their maternity colony. The cave is also home to an endangered cave crayfish and the threatened Ozark cavefish. Other interesting life forms found throughout the cave include: pseudoscorpions, isopods, amphipods, beetles, collembolans and other insects which are blind, without pigment, and strictly adapted to a subterranean habitat. Common wildlife species seen outside the cave include deer, squirrels, herons, swallows and hawks and numerous amphibians and reptiles.

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History
Logan Cave National Wildlife Refuge in Benton County, Arkansas became the 455th National Wildlife Refuge on March 14, 1989. This 123-acre Ozark Mountain refuge, which includes a limestone-solution cave, is located 20 miles west of Fayetteville, Arkansas and approximately 2 miles north of U.S. Highway #412.

Logan Cave was included within the Refuge System under: (1) the Endangered Species Act of 1973 which authorized the acquisition of lands for the conservation of endangered species, and (2) the authority of the Department of Interior and Related Agencies Appropriation Act of 1986 which appropriated funds for such purposes.

In past years, the water flow from Logan Spring was recorded at 5 million gallons per day. The spring water supplied the Logan community, a fish hatchery, and 49 fish ponds. Today, the spring forms a small stream which flows into the Osage Creek, a major tributary of the Illinois River.

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    Note
The refuge is closed to the public.




Recreation and Education Opportunities
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