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Lewis and Clark
National Wildlife Refuge


46 Steamboat Slough Rd
Cathlamet, WA   98612
E-mail: willapa@fws.gov
Phone Number: 360-795-3915
Visit the Refuge's Web Site:
http://www.fws.gov/lc
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  Overview
Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge
Lewis and Clark Refuge, near the mouth of the Columbia River, provides wintering and resting areas for an estimated 1,000 tundra swans, 5,000 geese, and 30,000 ducks. Other species include shorebirds and bald eagles.

Estuary waters provide vital food resources for juvenile salmon as they pause to become acclimated to salt water before entering the Pacific Ocean. Bald eagles are present year-round; there are 30-35 active nest sites.

Other fish species using the estuary include American shad, smelt, perch, starry flounder, bass, catfish, and Pacific lamprey. Harbor seals use sandbars and mud flats as resting sites at low tides, while seals and California sea lions feed on fish in the estuary. Beaver, raccoon, weasel, mink, muskrat, and river otter also live on the islands.


Getting There . . .
Lewis and Clark Refuge is administered from the Julia Butler Hansen Refuge office. To reach the office, exit Interstate 5 to Longview, Washington. Proceed west on Highway 4 to Cathlamet. Continue on Highway 4 about 1 mile past Cathlamet.

Turn left on Steamboat Slough Road. Refuge headquarters is about 0.25 miles to the right. The refuge itself is accessible only by boat. Boat launch facilities are located at various points in Washington and Oregon along the lower Columbia River, including Skamokawa in Washington and John Day Point and Aldrich Point in Oregon.

Some of the islands are visible from Highway 30, on the Oregon side of the Columbia River, 5 miles east of Astoria. From Interstate 5, take the Longview, Washington, exit. Proceed about 1 mile across a bridge over the Columbia River to Rainer, Oregon. Take Highway 30 west toward Astoria.


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These driving directions are provided as a general guide only. No representation is made or warranty given as to their content, road conditions or route usability or expeditiousness. User assumes all risk of use.

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Wildlife and Habitat

The refuge encompasses about 35,000 acres, mostly tidelands and open water in the Columbia River estuary, including over 8,300 acres of islands and sand bars.

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    Recreation and Education Opportunities
Fishing
Hunting
Photography
Wildlife Observation
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Management Activities
The refuge was established to preserve wetland habitats of the Columbia River estuary as a wintering area and migrational stopover for migratory birds, primarily waterfowl and shorebirds.

Refuge management programs include monitoring key wildlife populations, improving habitat on islands created by disposal of material dredged from the ship channel, regulating waterfowl hunting, and coordinating with local, State, and other Federal agencies relative to human activities in the estuary.