U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service logo A Unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System
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Hagerman
National Wildlife Refuge


6465 Refuge Road
Sherman, TX   75092 - 5817
E-mail: fw2_rw_hagerman@fws.gov
Phone Number: 903-786-2826
Visit the Refuge's Web Site:
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/hagerman/
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  Wildlife and Habitat

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Mississippi Kites and Scissor-tailed Flycatchers hunt the summer skies for insects. Great Blue Herons call the Refuge home in every season. The endangered least tern nests on the Refuge during late spring and early summer. Snow geese descend like a prairie blizzard on Hagerman in late autumn each year. Ross’s, Greater White-fronted and Canada Geese spend the entire winter loafing on Refuge farm fields, marshes, and open water. As many as 20,000 geese can be seen at the Refuge during the peak winter season. Ducks such as Mallards, Northern Shovelers, Green-winged Teal, and Northern Pintail are also common on the Refuge during fall and winter months. American White Pelicans wing in to the Refuge in April and again in September. Colorful Painted Buntings are here during spring and summer, and over 20 species of sparrows can be seen at various times of the year. Dickcissels, meadowlarks, and lark sparrows forage and nest in Refuge prairies and open fields.

Bottomland hardwoods along the creeks attract a variety of wildlife. White-tailed deer, bobcats, squirrels, turkeys and raccoons find food and raise their young here. Colorful wildflowers and prairie grasses provide seasonal food and shelter for birds and other wildlife that prefer more open areas. Butterflies, grasshoppers, and dragonflies flit through the summer prairie landscape.

Uplands provide nesting habitat for numerous songbirds. Wood ducks make their nests in tree cavities, mallards find grass clumps at the edges of marsh suitable for nesting, and great blue herons prefer dead trees located over Refuge ponds. Mammals raise their young in all habitat types, especially open fields and forests.

 
 
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