U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service logo A Unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System
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Litchfield
Wetland Management District


freshwater marsh at sunset
22274 615th Avenue
Litchfield, MN   55355
E-mail: litchfieldwetland@fws.gov
Phone Number: 320-693-2849
Visit the Refuge's Web Site:
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/litchfield_wmd/
The Litchfield Wetland Management District manages over 40,000 acres of marsh, prairie, transition, and woodland habitats.
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  History
Continued . . .

In the early 1960s, to help restore this lost habitat, the Service began the Small Wetlands Acquisition Program in 19 Minnesota counties, later expanding into most prairie pothole counties. The Litchfield Wetland Management District came into existence on October 1, 1978 and was first located in a rented storefront on Litchfield's main street.

The district was established to administer wetlands acquisition and management in Central and South Central Minnesota. The district took over responsibility for four of the original 19 counties from the Benson Wetland Management District and began work in eight new counties.

From 1978 to the present, the district has had responsibility in as many as 20 counties, adding and subtracting territory as new offices opened and programs changed. In 1991, The district offices moved into the strip mall next to Pamida. In 2000-2002, the district staff, pulling together a wide variety of expertise, built their own office building.

Today, the district covers seven counties - Kandiyohi, McLeod, Meeker, Renville, Stearns, Todd and Wright - and manages 146 WPAs, 33,000+ acres, and perpetual easements protecting 38,000+ acres of wetlands and grasslands.

Following are a few historical highlights. The first WPA purchased in Meeker County, the Litchfield WPA, became the maintenance shop in 1980 and, eventually, the district office in 2002. In 1985, the district began restoring wetlands on private lands and has restored more wetlands than any other FWS office.

 
 
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