National Wildlife Refuge System

At Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico, two black bears were among many wild animals to have their photos snapped by a motion-triggered camera when they stopped to drink at an old cattle well.
At Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico, two black bears were among many wild animals to have their photos snapped by a motion-triggered camera when they stopped to drink at an old cattle well.
Credit: USFWS

Wild Angles: News From the National Wildlife Refuge System

News for October 2010

Wild Angles is a reliable source of news about environmental issues, initiatives and events in the National Wildlife Refuge System, the world’s premier system of public lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife and plants.

RSS feed for Wild Angles Tip Sheet RSS


Loxahatchee Refuge Gets a Close-Up  TV cameras will take viewers deep inside Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge on Tuesday, October 26, when the Discovery Channel airs a segment of "Dirty Jobs" featuring the Florida refuge. The segment, titled "Wetland Warriors," shows Fish and Wildlife Service workers fighting the invasive melaleuca tree and conducting a prescribed burn.

Caught Drinking at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge  Keeping a low profile is tough at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico. Why, you can hardly drink a drop without someone’s noticing. That’s particularly true if you’re a wildlife creature and your drinking source is any of 20 former cattle wells now rigged with motion-sensor cameras.

Mapping Kenai's Soundscape   Why does Tim Mullet plan to collect moose poop for a two-year study of noise levels on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska? Because bagging moose pellets is safer and easier than taking blood samples from wild horned animals weighing half a ton and up.

Best Places to See Migrating Birds  Three national wildlife refuges are among eight sites acclaimed by the National Wildlife Federation as the best spots to see fall migrating birds: Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge in Missouri, Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge in Texas and Horicon National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin.

An Autumn Earful  It’s fall mating season at Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma, and there’s no mistaking the sound. Bull elk bent on attracting female elk to their harem and scaring off competitors throw back their heads and bugle. That is, they emit long, eerie, high-pitched calls.

No Car Needed to Visit These Refuges  Outdoor enthusiasts can already visit some national wildlife refuges without burning more fossil fuels. Soon they may be able to visit more.

Pitch In — and Plug In Free  Want to learn to drive a tractor, map invasive plants with a GPS unit or greet refuge visitors? Almost 40 national wildlife refuges offer volunteer opportunities to people willing to live on the refuge for a month or more. In return, resident volunteers often receive free housing or parking for their recreational vehicles plus ample time for birdwatching, hiking and other outdoor pursuits.

Refuges Mark 75 Years  In 1935 land prices were low, the need for conservation apparent, and the nation was laboring to recover from the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression. This helps explain why it was a banner year for the establishment of national wildlife refuges. Twenty-seven refuges, most of them in the country’s midsection, mark their 75th anniversaries in 2010.

Go Wild for Fall Color in the National Wildlife Refuge System  Here is a sampling of upcoming refuge events.

Archive of Past Stories

Wild Angles is published monthly by the Refuge System, part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under the Department of the Interior.

For information about items in the tip sheet, contact:
Martha Nudel, 703-358-1858
Claire Cassel, 703-358-2357

Last updated: October 1, 2010