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2005 "Volunteers Working With Invasives"
Grants Report Form


Display Report


PROJECT BACKGROUND INFORMATION



Project Title: Glacial Ridge NWR Invasive Species Control and Containment Venture
Region: 3
Station: Rydell/ Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuges
Contact Person:
Name and Phone Number
Juancarlos Giese 218-687-2229
Project Description:
(Up to 250 words)
Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge(NWR) is the most current inclusion into the National Wildlife Refuge System and is drastically in need of new, dynamic ways of identifying, mapping and eradicating invasive species. Managed through the Rydell National Wildlife Refuge, Glacial Ridge NWR is in dire need of invasive species control protocols in order to curtail current invasive species infestations and keeping new infestations from becoming a reality. The establishment of the Refuge is highly praised by county commissioners because of the cooperation with county concerns, and the control of invasive species is imperative to the continued cooperation by county officials. Maintenance and mowing of highway and county road rights-of-way by the MN-Department of Transportation is a major vector for spreading seedpods for various exotic species; including spotted knapweed(Centaurea maculosa), leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), reed canary grass(Phalaris arundinacea) and Canada thistle(Cirsium arvense), onto refuge lands. Glacial Ridge NWR is the largest continual tract of tallgrass prairie in the US and as new non-native seeds are dispersed, native habitats are in danger of collapsing because of these constant threats. Utilizing non-governmental organizations such as the Nature Conservancy from throughout northwestern Minnesota and University students from local colleges to aid in evaluation of infested habitats, mapping high priority areas with high concentrations of exotic species and training them to apply herbicides provides the perfect opportunity to incorporate local people and garner local support for such a pervasive problem. A special exotic species identification course will be held on the refuge prior to the eradication effort to familiarize volunteers and staff with the target pests.
List of Invasives Species Targeted:Common NameScientific Name
  Spotted Knapweed Centaurea maculosa
Leafy Spurge Euphorbia esula
Reed Canary Grass Phalaris arundinacea
Canada Thistle Cirsium arvense
Project Status: Completed
Project Completion Date
or Estimated Completion Date:
  (mm/dd/yyyy)
10/01/2006


VOLUNTEER INFORMATION

Volunteer Affiliation:
(Check all that apply)
    VA_SchoolGrp                            VA_Other
Volunteer Involvement:
Describe the type of work the volunteers performed. (Up to 150 words)
Through the use of volunteers, 1,200 acres of Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge land were surveyed for exotic species. Allison Lambert from the Nature Conservancys Glacial Ridge Project office inventoried sites within the Refuge boundary that were infested with exotics. Forty hours were spent collecting information on species including Reed Canary Grass and Leafy Spurge on refuge lands. Utilizing an ATV-mounted Garmin GPS unit, she systematically mapped 80% of invasive species sites within the Refuge boundary. Thirty U of M- Crookston students were able to donate 90 hours towards the project, inventorying 24 sites within 2the refuge boundary. Utilizing handheld Garmin GPS units, students were able to map the boundaries of each infestation. Students surveyed over 100 acres of land surrounding Refuge border roads, and railroad, rightsof-ways. Data from the summer was then transferred into the Rydell NWR GIS database in order to be interpreted for future coordination of pesticide application.
Total Number of Volunteers: 32
Total Number of Volunteer Hours: 130
Partnerships:
List both new and existing partnerships utilized in this project. (Up to 150 words).
Partnerships that are integral to the project completion were facilitated with the University of Minnesota at Crookston, who provided 90 hours of volunteer time through 30 volunteers and the Nature Conservancy's Glacial Ridge Project office, providing one student who donated 40 hours of volunteer time.


PROJECT RESULTS

Project Results:
Give an overview of the results of the project. Include quantifiable measure of success, such as maps produced, efficacy of control measures, number of sites where invasions were detected early and responded to, number of community contacts, etc. (Up to 250 words).
Through the use of volunteers from The Nature Conservancy and the University of Minnesota Crookston(UMC) , 1,200 acres of Refuge land were surveyed for exotic species as part of the Glacial Ridge NWR Invasive Species Control and Containment Venture. Throughout the summer, Allison Lambert from the Nature Conservancys Glacial Ridge Project office inventoried sites within the Refuge boundary that were infested with exotics. Forty hours were spent collecting information on exotic species on refuge lands. Utilizing an ATV-mounted Garmin GPS unit, she systematically mapped 80% of invasive species sites within the Refuge boundary. On Refuge lands, seeds from non-native species are continuously being introduced by passing motor vehicles. Coordinated through John Loegering, Wildlife Ecology professor at the U of M-Crookston, 30 students were able to donate 90 hours towards the project. On October 11, 2005 Rydell NWR ROS Juancarlos Giese provided the students with an exotic species identification course. Once Students were familiar with the target species, they were then broken into group of 10 in order for them to successfully inventory 24 sites within the refuge boundary. Utilizing handheld Garmin GPS units bpurchased with grant funds, students were able to map the boundaries of each infestation. Students surveyed over 100 acres of land surrounding Refuge border roads, and railroad, rightsof-ways. Data from the summer was then transferred into the Rydell NWR GIS database in order to be interpreted for future coordination of pesticide application. A 150-gallon herbicide sprayer, with a removable wick attachment, were purchased for application of herbicides onto surveyed lands during the 2006 season.
Number of Acres Treated: 200
Number of Acres Inventoried and/or Mapped: 1,200
Number of Acres Restored: 0


BUDGET INFORMATION

Budget: Account for funds in broad categories such as equipment, volunteer stipends, travel, coordinator salary/contract, etc.

Total Grant Amount:

$ 5,000.00


Breakdown of Expenditures:

Category

Total $ Spent
% of Total Grant
Equipment / Supplies $4,700.00 94%
Chemical $300.00 6%
Biocontrol Agents
Travel
Volunteer Stipends
Volunteer Coordinator Salary/Contract
Restoration Materials
Other
TOTAL $5,000.00 100%


Recommendations: (OPTIONAL)
How useful was this program for meeting refuge invasive species objectives and how can it be improved?

 

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