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Youth Conservation Corps 2015Every member of the Alaska Maritime Refuge staff contributes to the refuge's purposes of conserving marine resources. From the High School-aged Youth Conservation Corps Members to the Administrative Clerk working in the office, Wildlife Biologists and Ship's Crew conducting studies in the field, the Ranger greeting the public in the visitor center, and the Refuge Manager meeting with partners.

Permanent Employment
Learn more about other employment with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Alaska.

Seasonal Employment

Mainly during the summer, the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge uses Biological Technicians and Park Rangers to assist with projects at remote field camps around coastal Alaska and at its headquarters in Homer. 
Government housing is provided at the duty location, as well as uniforms and/or special field equipment if needed. Housing at most field camps will be a tent or small cabin.

Biological Technicians

  • Vacancies will be posted on the U.S. Office of Personnel Management USAJOBS website. Search by zip code 99603 for Alaska Maritime jobs.
  • You must be a U.S. citizen for paid positions.
  • We have 12-15 seasonal seabird monitoring positions, GS 4-7 
  • Learn more specifics about bio tech jobs with us here


Park Rangers and other categories

  • Hired on a case-by-case basis as needed.  
  • Vacancies will be posted on the U.S. Office of Personnel Management USAJOBS.  

 Student Employment Programs

If you are a student in an undergraduate or graduate degree program, the Pathways Program may be for you. It's an opportunity to earn money and continue your education, to train with people who manage the day-to-day business of the Fish and Wildlife Service, and to combine your academic study with on-the-job experience.

High School Students ages 15-18 may want to apply for our Youth Conservation Corps program, gaining experience in biology, visitor services, education, marine trades, and maintenance. To learn more email

Last Updated: Sep 09, 2015
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