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Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program

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  • Working Together for Wildlife

    Plants and animals don’t generally read maps and their need for habitat often stretches beyond the boundaries of Federal and state wild lands. To ensure that our wild heritage extends well into the future, the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program was created nearly 25 years ago to provide technical and financial assistance to private landowners and Tribes who are willing to work with the U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service and other partners on a voluntary basis to conserve and enhance habitat for migratory birds, threatened and endangered species, interjurisdictional fish, marine mammals, and other species of concern. This important program continues to evolve and helps to implement the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s vision for Strategic Habitat Conservation (SHC) and Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC).  

    Locally-based field biologists work one-on-one with private landowners and other partners to plan, implement, and monitor their projects. Partners Program staff help landowners find other sources of funding and help them through the permitting process, as necessary. Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex has an active Partners Program. Keep reading to learn more about specific ways the refuge is working with partners to help wildlife…

  • Leadbetter Coastal Dune and Beach Restoration

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    In an effort to restore native coastal dune habitat, Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex is partnering with Leadbetter Farms, LCC and Washington Department of Parks and Recreation Commission. Learn more about this habitat restoration project...

  • Ellsworth Creek Preserve Forest Restoration

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    In 2004, forest wildlife in coastal southwest Washington got a helping hand when a new partnership was formed. Discover how the Nature Conservancy combined resources with Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex to benefit forest plants and animals...

Page Photo Credits — Old growth tree - USFWS, Pink sandverbena - USFWS, Chainsaw thinning - © Rollin Bannow
Last Updated: Dec 10, 2013
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