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Visitor Activities

School group paddling

A school group paddling with refuge staff on Tippo Bayou.

  • Hunting

    Hunting

    Hunting is permitted during daylight hours within legal hunting seasons, which include deer, squirrel, rabbit, quail, waterfowl, raccoon, and frogs. Some areas are posted closed to hunting to provide sanctuary for wildlife and increase safety around public use facilities. Review the current North Mississippi Refuges Complex Hunting and Fishing Regulations for season dates and regulations. 

    All hunters age 16 or older must purchase a North Mississippi NWR hunting permit (code 606). Permits cost $15 and are available at the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks website or at any vendor that sells hunting licenses. A harvest report card, available at all refuge kiosks, must be completed and displayed on the dash of the vehicle so that the name is legible and clearly visible from the outside. Prior to leaving the refuge, the card must be completed and deposited at one of the refuge kiosks. 

  • Fishing

    Fishing

    Fishing is only permitted south of Highway 8 with the purchase of a North Mississippi NWR hunting permit. Permits cost $15 and are available at the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks website or at any vendor that sells hunting licenses. All anglers must follow regulations listed in the North Mississippi Refuges Complex Hunting and Fishing Regulations.

    A fishing pier is located directly off of Highway 8 at Long Branch. Four boat ramps provide access for small fishing boats, kayaks, and canoes into Long Branch and Tippo Bayou. Two of these are located directly off of Highway 8 and two unimproved ramps are located along Horsebarn Loop.

  • Wildlife Viewing

    Wildlife Viewing

    The refuge features a gravel wildlife drive that takes visitors through the southern half of the refuge. The drive is located on Horsebarn Loop, which starts and ends on Highway 8. This road takes visitors through a variety of habitats. In the summer months, visitors have opportunities to see wood storks and other wading birds, black-bellied whistling ducks, wood ducks with ducklings, white-tailed deer, rabbits, red-eared sliders, soft-shell turtles, and a variety of songbirds. During the winter, visitors may see many resident species like white-tailed deer and rabbits, as well as large numbers of migratory waterfowl. Please note that this road is only open to vehicles from mid-September through May 1. Hiking on the refuge is allowed year-round. 

    A boardwalk and observation tower are located north of Highway 8, about one mile down Mabus Road. This walk takes visitors through a forested wetland and terminates at an observation tower where hikers can look out over a field of grass and see wildlife such as white-tailed deer. When hiking on the boardwalk, walk quietly and try to see how many wildlife species you can see and hear. Wood ducks, hooded mergansers, herons and egrets, water snakes, and turtles can often be seen in the wetlands surrounding the wooden walkway.

  • Interpretation

    Interpretation

    Refuge staff can help with interpretive hikes at the refuge, teaching basic plant and wildlife identification and ecology concepts. For more information, please contact the Refuge Manager at (662) 226-8286.

  • Environmental Education

    Environmental Education

    Refuge staff can present programs on the National Wildlife Refuge System and the resources it manages in the classroom or in the field. For more information, please contact the Refuge Manager at (662) 226-8286

  • Photography

    Wildlife Photography

    With a diversity of habitats including moist soil units, young reforestation areas, and sloughs and bayous, Tallahatchie NWR provides a great setting to practice your photography skills. Commonly photographed species at the refuge include wintering waterfowl and wading birds.

    For those wishing to hike and take pictures, visit the boardwalk and observation tower. These are located about one mile north of Highway 8 on Mabus Road. The boardwalk winds through a cypress brake and terminates at an observation tower which overlooks a field. White-tailed deer and other wildlife can be seen feeding in the field during the winter.

    For those wishing to stay close to their vehicle, the refuge has a wildlife drive (Horsebarn Loop) which takes visitors through the southern portion of the refuge. Please note that this road is closed to traffic during the summer months. It's open from mid-September through early May.

Page Photo Credits — School group paddling by A. Breland/USFWS, Waterfowl on moist soil units by A. Breland/USFWS, Boat ramp off of Highway 8 by A. Breland/USFWS, Black-bellied whistling ducks by USFWS, A volunteer teaches students about creating art out of nature by A. Breland/USFWS, Refuge biologist teaching a local group of high school students by H. Jones/USFWS, A visitor photographing a rough green snake by A. Breland/USFWS
Last Updated: Feb 21, 2014
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