Skip Navigation

Wildlife & Habitat

Delta aerial

Midway Atoll's three small islands provide a virtually predator-free safe haven for the world's largest albatross colony encircled by a ring of coral reef that hosts an amazing variety of unique wildlife including green sea turtles, spinner dolphins, and endangered Hawaiian monk seals among an unprecedented rate of endemic fish.

  • Birds

    Eastern after verbesina thumbnail

    Twenty bird species native to the Hawaiian archipelago - nearly 3.5 million individual birds - nest on virtually every square foot of available habitat on Midway's three islands. Winter visitors and an occasional rare bird seek refuge on Midway as a critical sustenance link during their ocean travels.

    Learn More
  • Mammals

    Monk seal

    Endangered Hawaiian monk seals that pup and rear their young on Midway's beaches and nearshore waters. A resident pod of nearly 250 spinner dolphins that spend each day within Midway's protected lagoon waters and typically exit the lagoon each evening to feed in deeper waters.

    Learn More
  • Reptiles

    Green turtle

    Threatened green turtles haul out to rest on island shores - Green turtles are most common offshore of Sand Island's beaches, but they are seen by divers and fishermen throughout the lagoon and surrounding nearshore waters.

    Learn More
  • Fish

    Pearl Wrasse

    The waters surrounding Midway Atoll are a complex community of over 250 species of coral reef fish and invertebrates. Get a complete listing of the fish of Midway Atoll by following the link below.

    Learn More
  • Plants

    puncture vine

    Approximately 249 plant taxa have been reported on Midway from the time it was first discovered through 1992. Of these, 119 taxa were known only from cultivation, 104 taxa had become naturalized from either intentional or accidental introductions, and 24 taxa were native to Midway.  

    Learn More
  • Invertebrates

    Pencil urchin

    A huge diversity of marine invertebrates inhabit the lagoon and surrounding waters, including algae, corals, worms, snails, and seashells. To get a better understanding of this array of marine life, download our list using the link below.

    Learn More
Last Updated: Sep 22, 2014
Return to main navigation