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Get Involved

From its start in 1903, the National Wildlife Refuge System has owed its very existence to concerned citizens eager to protect America's natural resources. 


What Can You Do to Help Songbirds?
  • Water is extremely important, especially during times of drought. Consider putting a bird bath in your back yard. 
  • Planting native plants in your yard for a variety of fruits, nuts, and flowers gives the birds nutritionally important foods to feast upon.
  • Shelter is necessary as protection from predators such as hawks and cats, as well as from harsh weather. Plant native trees that provide a dense canopy. 
  • Dead trees and dense, native shrubs in a backyard provide great nesting habitat. 
  • Make your cat a “house cat.” Bells don’t work. 
  • Protect birds from large plate glass windows by placing a cut-out of a hawk silhouette on it. 
  • Be careful using pesticides. You may be eliminating important bird food. A single pair of warblers may remove caterpillars from more than 1,000,000 leaves in the 10 days it takes to fledge a nestful of young.
  • Become active in or join a wildlife conservation organization.
  • Get children involved so they develop a conservation ethic and understand the important role birds play in seed dispersal and reduction of insect pests. 
  • Spread the word! Share with your friends and neighbors your ideas about songbird conservation.

Other Ways You Can Help:

Purchase a Federal Duck Stamp 
Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamps, commonly known as “Duck Stamps,” are pictorial stamps produced by the U.S. Postal Service for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.  They were originally created in 1934 as the federal licenses required for hunting migratory waterfowl. Today, Federal Duck Stamps are a vital tool for wetland conservation.  Ninety-eight cents out of every dollar generated by the sales of Duck Stamps goes directly to purchase or lease wetland habitat for protection in the National Wildlife Refuge System.

Get a Pass!   
The America the Beautiful - National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Pass covers recreation opportunities on public lands managed by four Department of the Interior agencies – the National Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, and the Bureau of Reclamation, and by the Department of Agriculture’s U.S. Forest Service. One hundred percent of the revenue derived from passes sold at federal recreation sites will directly benefit the selling agency and no less than 80 percent of the revenue will remain at the site where the pass was sold. The pass applies to those locations that currently have entrance or standard amenity fees.

Page Photo Credits — Swamp lily / David Sarkozi
Last Updated: Dec 03, 2012
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