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Features

  • White-tailed deer by Michael Leary

    2015-16 Hunt Permits Available Now!

    Beginning July 15, hunters may purchase the 2015-16 Hunt Permit. Please visit the refuge's hunting web page for details.

    Learn More

Recent Bird Sightings

eBird Trail Tracker

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Find out what birds are currently being seen at the refuge using the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's eBird Trail Tracker.

Click here to access the eBird Trail Tracker

About the Complex

Savannah Coastal Refuges Complex

The Savannah Coastal Refuges Complex is comprised of seven national wildlife refuges, totaling 56,949 acres, located in coastal Georgia and South Carolina.

Harris Neck is managed as part of the Savannah Coastal Refuges Complex.

Learn more about the complex 

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS  

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Enjoy Your Visit!

  • Visitor Activities

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    Wildlife-dependent recreational activities are offered year-round at Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge including wildlife viewing, photography, hiking, bicycling, fishing and hunting. Come and enjoy YOUR National Wildlife Refuge!

    Learn more...
  • Hunt Information

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    Harris Neck NWR offers archery and gun hunting opportunities for both deer and feral hogs. A refuge hunt permit and State licenses are required of all hunter 16 and over.

    Click here for detailed hunting information...
  • History of the Refuge

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    The history of Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge is as rich and diverse as the wildlife and habitat resources protected there today.

    Learn more...
  • Find a Baby Bird or Injured Wildlife?

    The refuge is not equipped to take in or care for injured or orphaned animals. The Georgia Dept. of Natural Resources maintains a list of permitted wildlife rehabilitators that you may contact. Georgia DNR is also who should be contacted for any nuisance wildlife issues, including aggressive alligators.

    Georgia Department of Natural Resources
Page Photo Credits — All photos courtesy of USFWS unless otherwise noted., Wood stork chicks - John Carrington
Last Updated: Jul 15, 2015
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