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Facilities

OuthouseWhen you visit the Monument, you're visiting on its terms, not yours. If you're looking for spas, visit the nearby Tri-Cities.

Please be aware that facilities are limited and primitive in nature. That said, the Monument is a relatively safe place to visit, provided you follow common sense for the outdoors—let someone know where you're going and when you'll be back, don't stick your hands in places where rattlesnakes might be hiding, carry plenty of water, etc. You know these things; every land management agency warns you about them.

What you don't know is what facilities and amenities you can expect on the Monument. In short, not many.

Roads: There are two state highways that cross the Monument—State Route 240 south of the Columbia River and State Route 24 on the north side. Access roads in the Wahluke Unit are nearly all graveled. Passenger cars are fine for most roads, with two exceptions; (1) the Saddle Mountain access road may seasonally require high clearance and/or four wheel drive as it ascends up the Mountain; and (2) the WB-10 pond access road is sand/dirt and requires high clearance and/or four-wheel drive. Access to the Ringold Unit is paved county roads, until you hit the Monument when it turns to gravel and dirt.

When driving, please be watchful for bicyclists, equestrian users and pedestrians, who may be using the roadways.

Restrooms: By the way, that isn't really one of our outhouses above. Scared the more squeamish of you a bit, didn't we? In fact, the Vernita Bridge Rest Stop is located along State Route 24, just south of the Vernita Bridge. Operated by the Washington State Department of Transportation, this site is open 24 hours and provides flush toilets, picnic tables, shade trees, drinking water, garbage cans and informational signs. Portable toilets are placed at the White Bluffs Boat Launch and Parking Lots 2 and 7 from June through October. Beyond that, if you brought it in with you, please take it out.

Boat Launches: See the Boating page.

Cell Phone Coverage: Because it's a relatively flat area surrounding by high ridges with cell towers, cell phone reception (in case of emergencies) is quite good. Of course, if you're in washes or canyons, you may have to hike a bit to get to an area with coverage.

Page Photo Credits — Outhouse - Jim Bahn
Last Updated: May 03, 2013
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