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Visitor Activities

Fishing the River

Experience the outdoors at Great River National Wildlife Refuge.

  • Hunting

    Deer Hunter

    Hunting is permitted at the Long Island Division in Illinois and Fox Island Division in Missouri in accordance state hunting regulations. Some restrictions to these dates may apply, so please review the Public Use Regulations brochure or call the refuge before your visit.

    The Delair Division is closed to the public, with the exception of a managed muzzleloader deer hunt in January.

    Contact the Illinois Department of Natural Resources at http://www.dnr.illinois.gov for information on Illinois state hunting licenses and regulations.

    Contact the Missouri Department of Conservation at http://mdc.mo.gov for information on Missouri state hunting licenses and regulations.

  • Fishing

    Fishing

    Fishing is allowed on the Fox Island and Long Island Division of the Great River National Wildlife Refuge, however some restrictions may apply to the seasons, so please review the Public Use Regulations brochure or call the refuge before your visit.

    The Delair Division is closed to the public, therefore fishing is not allowed.

    Contact the Illinois Department of Natural Resources at http://www.dnr.illinois.gov for information on Illinois state fishing licenses and regulations.

    Contact the Missouri Department of Conservation at http://mdc.mo.gov for information on Missouri state fishing licenses and regulations.

  • Wildlife Viewing

    River Otter

    Great River National Wildlife Refuge is centrally located along the Mississippi Flyway, a major migration route for migratory birds, affording visitors an excellent opportunity to see wildlife. More than 200 species of birds visit the refuge throughout the year. Bald eagles are common in the winter as they gather near the river to feed in open water areas. Herons and egrets are seen during the summer feeding along the shores and in the wetlands. Deer, squirrel, raccoon, muskrat, otter, turkey, beaver, skunk, and opossum are year-round residents. 

  • Environmental Education

    Education

    Environmental education programs and guided tours are available for schools, scouts, and other groups. To schedule a visit, please call the refuge office in advance. 

  • Photography

    Barred Owl

    Perhaps the fastest growing activity on national wildlife refuges in the past ten years has been wildlife photography. The refuge provides opportunities to view wildlife in their natural habitat. Take a day to quietly observe turtles basking in the sun or a cerulean warbler foraging in the floodplain forest.

Page Photo Credits — Credit: USFWS
Last Updated: Sep 20, 2013
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