Skip Navigation

About the Refuge

Clear Lake National Wildlife Refuge

Clear Lake National Wildlife Refuge  

 Clear Lake Refuge in northeastern California consists of approximately 20,000 acres of open water surrounded by over 26,000 acres of upland bunchgrass, low sagebrush, and juniper habitat. Small, rocky islands in the lake provide nesting sites for American white pelicans, double-crested cormorants, and other colonial nesting birds.  

 The upland areas provide habitat for pronghorn antelope, mule deer, and sage grouse. The Clear Lake Reservoir is the primary source of water for the agricultural program of the eastern half of the Klamath Basin, with water levels regulated by the Bureau of Reclamation.  

 Except for limited waterfowl and pronghorn antelope hunting during the regular California State seasons, the refuge is closed to all public access to protect fragile habitats and to reduce disturbance to wildlife. Some viewing of strutting sage grouse occurs in the spring from U.S. Forest Service Road 136, which runs along and through the refuge's southern boundary.   

Getting There . . . 


Travel south on State Highway 139 for 20 miles from the town of Tulelake, California. Turn east onto Clear Lake Reservoir Road; and travel approximately 10 miles to the refuge's south boundary.  

The roads leading to the refuge are not paved and 4 wheel drive is suggested.  

 
Last Updated: Jan 17, 2013
Return to main navigation