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About the Refuge

Sunset

Cabeza Prieta, Spanish for "dark (or dirty) head," refers to a lava-topped, granite peak in a remote mountain range in the western corner of the refuge.

 

Though it officially became a national wildlife refuge in 1975, this landscape has been managed for the benefit of wildlife since 1939 when it was established as a ‘Game Range’ and managed for desert bighorn sheep. Today, the refuge’s management priorities are primarily focused on the endangered Sonoran pronghorn, bighorn sheep and lesser long-nosed bat.

Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge encompasses 860,000 acres, a portion of which are open to the public for wildlife related activities including wildlife watching and photography, primitive camping, limited hunting, and environmental education and interpretation.

Almost all of the refuge is designated wilderness and it is part of the National Wildlife Refuge System, a national network of lands and waters set aside for the benefit of wildlife and you.

Follow this link to download the refuge tear sheet, including a map (requires Flash).

Last Updated: Jul 12, 2013
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