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Help Injured Wildlife

Capturing Injured EagleIn this remote area, everyone can play a role in caring for injured wildlife. Be sure you know the rules and recommendations, and always choose your safety first.

Birds:

  • If you spot an injured bird during business hours (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.), call our office in King Salmon: 907-246-3339. 
  • After hours, you can leave a message on the voicemail for the Bird Treatment and Learning Center (Bird TLC) in Anchorage: 907-562-4852. 
  • If you see a large number of sick or dying birds, call our office in King Salmon during business hours, or call 1-866-BRDFLU (1-866-527-3358).  Be ready to identify the type of bird, its symptoms, the date and time found, and the location. 
  • Do not handle sick or dead birds without protection.
  • You may need blankets or towels to safely restrain the bird.
  • Always wear thick gloves, and protect your eyes. 

Marine Mammals:

  • It is illegal under the Marine Mammal Protection Act to touch a marine mammal without the proper authorization.  This is to protect both you and the animal. 
  • On the other hand, in remote areas, there are unlikely to be authorized personnel or veterinarians to help. 
    • If you see a marine mammal you believe is in distress or out of its natural habitat, and want to help, you should call the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward (1-888-774-7325, 24 hours).
    • Or call the Marine Mammals Management Office of the USFWS in Anchorage (1-800-362-5148, business hours). 
    • A 24 hour emergency hotline for dead or injured marine mammals is: 1-877-925-7773.

Dead Animals:

  • Dead eagles are sent to the National Eagle Repository in Colorado, where the feathers and other parts are made available for education and for religious purposes. 
  • Please call the Marine Mammals Management office to report dead marine mammals and learn how to safely ship the carcasses.
  • Dead foxes, coyotes, wolves, and lynx should not be touched.  They may be carrying rabies.
  • Remember: wear gloves when handling dead animals and wash your hands and clothes when you finish.  
Page Photo Credits — Capturing Injured Eagle, Liz Julian/USFWS
Last Updated: Feb 12, 2014
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