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Conservation

Refuge conservation plans are called “comprehensive conservation plans” (CCPs).

 

  • Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    CCP 118

    The purpose of a CCP is to specify a management direction for the Refuge for the next 15 years. The goals, objectives, and strategies for improving Refuge conditions—including the types of habitat we will provide, partnership opportunities, and management actions needed to achieve desired conditions – are described in the CCP. The Service’s preferred alternative for managing the Refuge and its effects on the human environment, are described in the CCP as well.

    The Refuge System is managed by the Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), an agency within the U.S. Department of the Interior. The Service is the primary Federal entity responsible for conserving and enhancing the Nation’s fish and wildlife populations and their habitats. Although the Service shares this responsibility with other Federal, State, tribal, local, and private entities, the Service has specific trust resource responsibilities for migratory birds, threatened and endangered species, certain anadromous fish, certain marine mammals, coral reef ecosystems, wetlands, and other special aquatic habitats. The Service also has similar trust responsibilities for the lands and waters it administers to support the conservation and enhancement of all fish and wildlife and their associated habitats.

     

    See Our CCP 

  • National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act

    Water lily

    For almost a century, the 95-million-acre National Wildlife Refuge System had been managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under a variety of laws without an "Organic Act" or comprehensive legislation spelling out how it ought to be managed and used by the public. On October 9, 1997, President Clinton signed the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 (Public Law 105-57 (text) (PDF)). The Act amends the National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 in a manner that provides an “Organic Act” for the Refuge System.

    The Act was passed to ensure that the Refuge System is managed as a national system of related lands, waters, and interests for the protection and conservation of our Nation's wildlife resources.

    The only system of Federal lands devoted specifically to wildlife, the National Wildlife Refuge System is a network of diverse and strategically located habitats. More than 545 national wildlife refuges and thousands of waterfowl production areas across the United States teem with millions of migratory birds, serve as havens for hundreds of endangered species, and host an enormous variety of other plants and animals. Over 39 million people visit units of the National Wildlife Refuge System each year to enjoy a wide range of wildlife related recreational opportunities.

    The passage of this Act gave guidance to the Secretary of the Interior for the overall management of the Refuge System. The Act's main components include:

         * a strong and singular wildlife conservation Mission for the Refuge System
         *a requirement that the Secretary of the Interior maintain the biological integrity, diversity and environmental health of the Refuge System
         *a new process for determining compatible uses on refuges
         *a recognition that wildlife-dependent recreational uses involving hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental       education and interpretation, when determined to be compatible, are legitimate and appropriate public uses of the Refuge System
         *that these compatible wildlife-dependent recreational uses are the priority general public uses of the Refuge System; and a requirement for preparing a comprehensive conservation plan for each refuge.
     

Last Updated: Jan 23, 2014
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