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About the Refuge

Bobcat in tree

The chorus of thousands of waterfowl, wind moving through coastal prairie, the splash of an alligator going for a swim, a high-pitched call of a fulvous whistling duck. These are just some of the sounds you may hear when visiting the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge.


The meandering bayous of Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge cut through ancient flood plains, creating vast expanses of coastal marsh and prairie bordering Galveston Bay in southeast Texas. The marshes and prairies are host or home to an abundance of wildlife, from migratory birds, to alligators, to bobcats, and more.

Established in 1963, the 34,000-acre refuge is part of the National Wildlife Refuge System, a national network of lands and waters set aside for the benefit of wildlife and you.  The management focus of the refuge (and its companion refuges, McFaddin and Texas Point) is to protect and manage the coastal marsh for migrating, wintering and breeding waterfowl, shorebirds and waterbirds, and provide strategic and crucial nesting areas for the neotropical migratory songbirds migrating across the Gulf of Mexico.  
Page Photo Credits — William Powell 2012: Bobcat in tree/ William Powell
Last Updated: Jul 09, 2012
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