Raleigh Ecological Services Field Office
Conserving the Nature of America

Shad in School - Hands On Activities

American Shad

American Shad

Monitor Your Local Waterway:

Monitor you local waterway, stream, or pond: Contact North Carolina Division of Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, Surface Water Protection, Raleigh Regional Office, to lead a field experience for you school.

Staff can assist teachers and students in identifying and monitoring their local waterway for dissolved oxygen, temperature turbidity; students can assist with determination of whether stream is perennial, intermittent or ephemeral. Student will use D Nets for monitoring macro invertebrates. For general information on this program call 919-791-4200 or find your local county Point of Contact.

Staff contacts by County

River Basin Basin Planner
Broad Melanie Williams
919-807-6447
Cape Fear Nora Deamer
919-807-6431
Catawba Melanie Williams
919-807-6447
Chowan Heather Patt
919-807-6448
French Broad Dianne Reid
919-807-6427
Hiwassee Dianne Reid
919-807-6427
Little Tennessee Dianne Reid
919-807-6427
Lumber Michael Tutwiler
919-807-6433
Neuse Nora Deamer
919-807-6431

New

Dianne Reid
919-807-6427
Pasquotank Heather Pratt
919-807-6448
Roanoke Melanie Williams
919-807-6447
Savannah Dianne Reid
919-807-6427
Tar-Pamlico Heather Patt
919-807-6448
Watauga Dianne Reid
919-807-6427
White Oak Melanie Williams
919-807-6447
Yadkin-Pee Dee Heather Patt
919-807-6448

Participate in the Biologist in Training Program

Participate in the Biologist in Training Program (BiT) from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and interview a fish biologist, aquarist or other person that works with fish. Visit your local fish hatchery or aquarium. The Biologist-in-Training program is an experiential environmental education program that promotes National Fish Hatcheries as unique outdoor classrooms. The program fosters direct interactions with fish and aquatic environments. Students gain a first-hand understanding of aquatic resources and a link to a biologist mentor. BiT is a flexible program with layers of components including an engaging 20 page activity guide; an activity card with ideas for outdoor exploration and tips for parents; loaner bins filled with materials for group extension activities; certificates, patches and stickers upon program completion; and supporting materials for schools and facilitators. BiT may be taught anywhere water flows. Activities are aligned with national science education standards for upper elementary students. BiT can be self-guided or enhanced with adult interpretation. Free materials are offered through 21 USFWS field stations and are available on the internet: www.fws.gov/southeast/bit

Find your Ecological Address

Find out your "ecological address" and "ecological footprint". Visit http://www.eenorthcarolina.org/ecoaddress.htm

Participate in Watershed Monitoring Project

Participate in watershed monitoring projects by using the new Bureau of Land Management Green Kit. The kit contains ideas for planning a watershed monitoring trip at your school. Hands on the Land and Bureau of Land Management - Riparian Module

Plant a Shad Bush on Your Campus

You can plant a shad bush (Amelanchier spp.) on your school grounds or nearby watershed area to symbolize the connection of the bushes blooming and the return of the American shad to local waterways. The shad bush, Amelanchier spp., is a native shrub or tree that blooms in the spring at the same time that American shad are returning to lay their eggs far up North Carolina rivers. American Indians in this region used the blooming bushes as a sign of when it was time to go fishing for shad. The shad bush blooms in March-April and has small white flowers. It produces edible berries that are favored by birds and other wildlife. Many native plant nurseries carry this plant. You can order one or more and plant them at your school. They are easy to grow and grow rapidly.

There is also a book available that discusses the Native American connection to the American Shad entitled "When the Shad Bush Blooms". Teachers can purchase this book and incorporate into a learning project.

Last Updated: November 1, 2012