Pacific Region Highlights


Early 20th Century coiled basket

Early 20th Century coiled basket DOI Image

Native Americans past and present understand the importance of Pollinators


Today marks the start of #PollinatorWeek to celebrate the importance of pollinators such as birds, butterflies, bats and bees. From the Department of the Interior's collection, here's an early 20th-century coiled basket from the Washoe Tribe, made of willow fibers and incorporating butterfly designs. Butterflies act as intermediaries among plants, helping them to reproduce. Butterflies rely almost exclusively on flower nectar for sustenance, and as butterflies alight on blossoms to feed, pollen coasts their wings and gets carried from plant to plant.


Learn more from the DOI Museum


Tribes working to protect imperilled species like this Pacific Lamprey

Tribes working to protect imperilled species like this Pacific Lamprey FWS Image

Service now accepting applications for 2016 Tribal Wildlife Grants


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provides funds to Native American Tribes to develop and implement programs for the benefit of wildlife and their habitat, including species of Native American cultural or traditional importance and species that are not hunted or fished.  Proposals are now being accepted at the Pacific Regional Office and must be submitted with a postmark of no later than October 30, 2015.  Applications should be mailed to:  Nathan Dexter, USFWS Native American Liaison, 911 N.E. 11th Avenue, Portland, Oregon  97232.  For questions or assistance you may call (503) 231-6121.


Learn more about the TWGs

See News Release

Download the application kit


Tribal biologists collar an Elk in Washington State

Tribal biologists collar an Elk in Washington State FWS Image

Native American Tribes in Oregon and Washington to Receive Nearly $1 Million


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced nearly $4.2 million awarded as part of the Tribal Wildlife Grants program to support 22 fish and wildlife conservation projects across the nation. Nearly $1 Million will go to Native American Tribes in Oregon and Washington that will benefit wildlife and habitat, including species of cultural or traditional importance and species that are not hunted or fished.


News Release

More about the Tribal Wildlife Grants


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