Climate Change in the Pacific Region
Pacific Region
 

Climate Change Nature Resources and Coastal Management

Presentation Title:
Effects of Climate Change on the Freshwater Life-history of Anadromous Fish in the Pacific Northwest

Desription of Presentation:
Freshwater ecosystems used by Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in western North America will potentially undergo major changes as a consequence of climate change. Of particular importance to salmonids are the alteration of the timing, duration, and nature of the flow regime, and changes in the magnitude and timing of water temperatures. The magnitude and direction of the changes will vary widely across the distributional range of these fish and will depend to a large extent on the individual life-history stage as well as on the timing of the transition between life-history stages.

Presenter Name & Contact Info:
Gordon H. Reeves USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Corvallis, OR

Presenter's Biography:
Gordie Reeves is a Research Fish Biologist in the PNW Research Station. His expertise is in the freshwater ecology of anadromous salmon and trout, conservation biology of those fish and their freshwater habitat, and aquatic aspects of landscape ecology. He has studied the ecology of anadromous salmon and trout in the Pacific Northwest, northern California, and Alaska. He has published over 50 papers on the freshwater ecology of Pacific salmon and trout, effects of land management activities on the freshwater habitats of these fish, conservation plans, and dynamics of aquatic ecosystems in the PNW. He was a member of committees that developed and evaluated management options for managing federal lands in the PNW and Alaska. He currently serves as the Team Leader of the Aquatic and Land Interaction Program at the PNW Research Station in Corvallis. He currently is a member of the NOAA Fisheries Technical Recovery Team for coho salmon in coastal Oregon and was a co-leader of the Coastal Landscape Analysis and Modeling Study, a long-term, large, interdisciplinary project to model and evaluate forest policy effects at multiple scales.

Recommended Reading:

  • Crozier, L. and R.W. Zabel. 2006. Climate impacts at multiple scales: evidence for differential population responses in juvenile Chinook salmon. Journal of Animal Ecology 75:1100-1109.
  • Independent Scientific Advisory Board. 2007. Climate change impacts on Columbia River basin fish and wildlife. ISAP Climate Change Report. ISAB 2007-2. Portland, OR (ISAB@nwcouncil.org).
  • Rand, P.S., S.G. Hinch, J. Morrison, and 6 co-authors. 2006. Effects of river discharge, temperature, and future climates on energetics and mortality of adult migrating Fraser River sockeye salmon. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 135:655-667.

Download the Presentation: PDF File PDF File 1.34 MB

 

Last updated: February 4, 2009


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Title Effects of Climate Change on the Freshwater Life-history of Anadromous Fish in the Pacific Northwest
Presentation_description Freshwater ecosystems used by Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in western North America will potentially undergo major changes as a consequence of climate change. Of particular importance to salmonids are the alteration of the timing, duration, and nature of the flow regime, and changes in the magnitude and timing of water temperatures. The magnitude and direction of the changes will vary widely across the distributional range of these fish and will depend to a large extent on the individual life-history stage as well as on the timing of the transition between life-history stages.
name Gordon H. Reeves
contact_info USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Corvallis, OR
biography Gordie Reeves is a Research Fish Biologist in the PNW Research Station. His expertise is in the freshwater ecology of anadromous salmon and trout, conservation biology of those fish and their freshwater habitat, and aquatic aspects of landscape ecology. He has studied the ecology of anadromous salmon and trout in the Pacific Northwest, northern California, and Alaska. He has published over 50 papers on the freshwater ecology of Pacific salmon and trout, effects of land management activities on the freshwater habitats of these fish, conservation plans, and dynamics of aquatic ecosystems in the PNW. He was a member of committees that developed and evaluated management options for managing federal lands in the PNW and Alaska. He currently serves as the Team Leader of the Aquatic and Land Interaction Program at the PNW Research Station in Corvallis. He currently is a member of the NOAA Fisheries Technical Recovery Team for coho salmon in coastal Oregon and was a co-leader of the Coastal Landscape Analysis and Modeling Study, a long-term, large, interdisciplinary project to model and evaluate forest policy effects at multiple scales.
rec_readings Crozier, L. and R.W. Zabel. 2006. Climate impacts at multiple scales: evidence for differential population responses in juvenile Chinook salmon. Journal of Animal Ecology 75:1100-1109.
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rec_readings2 Independent Scientific Advisory Board. 2007. Climate change impacts on Columbia River basin fish and wildlife. ISAP Climate Change Report. ISAB 2007-2. Portland, OR (ISAB@nwcouncil.org).
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rec_readings3 Rand, P.S., S.G. Hinch, J. Morrison, and 6 co-authors. 2006. Effects of river discharge, temperature, and future climates on energetics and mortality of adult migrating Fraser River sockeye salmon. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 135:655-667.
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Presentation sessiond/Reeves_USGS Reeves Fish and Climate Jan 2009.pdf