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USFWS Seeks Additional Information on West Coast Fisher Populations

Photo credit: USFWS

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reopened the comment period on the proposal to list the West Coast population of fisher as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.

The Service is seeking additional information on threats to the fisher population to more fully inform the final listing decision. Comments will be accepted through May 14, 2015, and the final decision whether to list the species is now April 7, 2016. Read News Release>

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USFWS to Initiate Review of Northern Spotted Owl Status under Endangered Species Act

Photo - Northern Spotted Owl (USFWS).The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is commencing an evaluation of the status of the northern spotted owl, as required under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

This review is the result of a petition to change the status of the owl from threatened to endangered. The review will also serve as the five-year review of the species as required under the ESA, and which was last completed in 2011. A five-year status review evaluates whether a federally protected species should remain listed, or if it meets the criteria for reclassification. Read News Release>

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Western Snowy Plovers Nesting on Oregon Coast near Nehalem Spit

photo credit: Jim JohnsonA surprise sighting of a pair of western snowy plovers nesting on the spit south of Nehalem Bay State Park has Oregon State Parks staff on “bird alert.” It also means some changes for beachgoers on the two-mile stretch of beach south of the park’s day-use area.

“This is early in the year for snowy plovers to be nesting,” said Oregon Parks and Recreation (OPRD) Wildlife Biologist Vanessa Blackstone, who discovered the nest April 3. “It’s exciting news. This is the first time in 30 years that we have a confirmed nest here, and supports all the hard work Oregonians have done to help this species survive.” Other adult male and female plovers have been seen along the spit in recent days as well.Read more>

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