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October 28, 2011
Public Meetings on Draft Management Alternatives
Public meetings are scheduled and public comments are requested by December 16, 2011

The Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex has scheduled a series of public meetings to present preliminary draft management alternatives developed as part of the Comprehensive Conservation Plan for Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges (Refuges). During these public meetings, staff from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will present preliminary draft versions of three management alternatives they developed for each NWR to guide management during the next 15 years. The preliminary alternatives were designed to achieve the Refuges’ purposes, the National Wildlife Refuge System mission, and to meet policy requirements while addressing issues and ideas raised during public scoping last fall.

Everyone is invited to attend the following public meetings:

Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge
Date: Wednesday, November 9, 2011
Time: 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Place: Bandon Community Center, 1200 11th Street SW, Bandon

Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge
Date: Thursday, November 10, 2011
Time: 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Place: Lincoln City Council Chambers, 801 SW Highway 101, Lincoln City

Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge
Date: Wednesday, November 16, 2011
Time: 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Place: Kiawanda Community Center, 34600 Cape Kiwanda Dr., Pacific City

The objective for each meeting will be to present information on the proposed alternatives and to discuss your ideas or concerns. We need your input to complete our analysis and proceed with the development of the Refuge Complex’s 15-year comprehensive conservation plan. You can share your ideas by attending one of the public meetings and/or by submitting written comments. Comments on the alternatives should be mailed, faxed, or e-mailed by December 16, 2011, to Roy Lowe, Project Leader, Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 2127 SE Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR 97365; fax number (541)867-4551; or e-mail Oregoncoastccp@fws.gov. For more information please call the Refuge Complex office in Newport at 541-867-4550, or go to www.fws.gov/oregoncoast.

A Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) is a 15-year plan that guides a NWR’s management decisions, and identifies long-range refuge goals, objectives, and strategies for achieving the purposes for which the refuge was established. During the CCP planning process, many elements will be considered, including wildlife and habitat protection and management, and public use opportunities. More information about the CCP process is available at www.fws.gov/pacific/planning/.
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 2:53 PM
June 7, 2011
Weekend Birding Programs offered at Cannon Beach
A free talk entitled "How to Attract Songbirds to Your Backyard" will be given by Dawn Grafe of the US Fish & Wildlife Service on Friday June 10 at 7:00 PM at the Cannon Beach Chamber/Community Hall. She will also lead a songbird hike on the Cannon Beach Trail the following morning, Saturday June 11 at 8:00 AM. Meet at the birding platform near the Cannon Beach lagoons near the east end of 2nd Street. Later Saturday morning, at 11:00 at the city hall council chambers, Dawn will give a talk on The Birds of Haystack Rock. All are welcome!
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 4:02 PM
May 4, 2011
Celebrate International Migratory Bird Day May 11
Go Wild, Go Birding: Celebrate International Migratory Bird Day

Get outside and enjoy the multiple activities happening around Newport for International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD) on Saturday, May 14. Go Wild, Go Birding� is this year’s IMBD theme, created to celebrate the migration of birds to North American breeding grounds from Southern non-breeding grounds. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Parks and Recreation and local community groups have partnered to offer a wide range of events for all to enjoy.

The Bureau of Land Management is offering a Free Fee Day at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area. Yaquina Head provides unique opportunities to see birds with a large number of marine breeding colonies located just off the mainland. From 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Staff and volunteers will be at the Cobble Beach Viewing Deck with spotting scopes and an interpretive table to help visitors learn about the birds and allow for a close view of these marine birds in action. Range Bayer, from Yaquina Birders and Naturalists will lead a bird walk starting at the Yaquina Head Interpretive Center beginning at 8:30 a.m. The Service will be in the Interpretive Center from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. with an interpretive table and games for children and families. For more information and directions for IMBD 2011 events at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area call (541) 574-3100.

Oregon Parks and Recreation will offer activities at Beaver Creek State Natural Area starting at 9:00 a.m. with a guided bird walk, incorporating Beaver Creek’s already established Bird Count Census throughout the Natural Area. This guided walk will have naturalists and expert birders to help beginners identify birds; all ages and abilities welcomed. From 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Welcome Center, visitors will get first-hand information on local birds and bird watching techniques by roaming naturalists on the observation deck. The Service will have a booth in the Welcome Center where visitors can obtain free information on local birds and At 12:00 p.m., Dawn Grafe Park Ranger, visitor services manager with the Service, will give a presentation on how to establish a bird feeding station in your backyard. For more information and directions for Bird Day 2011 email Brian Fowler at brian.fowler@state.or.us or call (541) 563-6413.

If you would prefer to stay at home you can still celebrate IMBD by participating in the citizen science North American Migration Count (NAMC). NAMC was started in 1992 to offer bird watchers the opportunity to watch and report their findings to contribute to the monitoring of bird spring migration. For more information contact Chuck Gates at cgates326@gmail.com.
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 10:04 AM
February 16, 2011
Conservation through the Arts
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is accepting entries for the 2011 Oregon Junior Duck Stamp Contest, which is administered by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex. To participate draw, paint or color an original picture that is 9"x12" and horizontal featuring North American waterfowl species' in their habitat. Full contest rules, a downloadable entry form, and a list of the permitted species can be found online at www.fws.gov/juniorduck. Entries must be postmarked by March 15, 2011.

The Federal Junior Duck Stamp Contest is a nationwide competition, sponsored by the Service, which serves to foster student awareness and appreciation of waterfowl and their wetland habitat through art. Public, private, and home school students from kindergarten through 12th grade are encouraged to enter in this unique "conservation through the arts" program.

A Junior Duck Stamp Contest has been held annually in Oregon since 1998. In 2010, Christine Swanson from West Linn won the competition with an acrylic painting of a Ring-necked Duck. Her painting went on to compete nationally and placed in the top 10. In addition to the art competition, there is also an opportunity for each young artist to provide a conservation message. The 2010 conservation message winner was Ally Chang from Portland. Ally is helping to promote awareness of our natural world through her statement, "Conservation is a way of life, conserving nature makes the world a more beautiful place for all."

The entries will be judged according to grade: K-3, 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12. In each of these grade categories there are 25 ribbons awarded; 3-First place, 3-Second place, 3-Third place, and 16-Honorable Mentions. The "Best of Show" is chosen from the 12 First place winners and will represent Oregon at the National Junior Duck Stamp Contest to be held April 15th at John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge in Philadelphia. Everyone who enters will receive a Certificate of Participation and have their original artwork returned.

At the National level there will be four cash prize winners. First Place will be awarded $5,000 and a free trip in the summer to attend the First Day of Sales Ceremony. Second Place will receive $3,000, Third Place will receive $2,000, and the National Conservation Message First Place winner will be awarded $500.

A five judge panel has been invited to participate in the selection process – Mark Nebeker, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Robyn Thorson, Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Peter Mathios, Freelance Artist; Esther Lev, The Wetlands Conservancy; and Cathy Macdonald, The Nature Conservancy. The judging event will be open for the general public to observe, and will begin at 9:30 a.m. on March 24, 2011 at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Regional Office, 911 NE 11th Ave, Portland.

The first place art from the National contest is used to create a National Junior Duck Stamp each year. The Junior Duck Stamp is available for purchase at the cost of $5 from the U.S. Postal Service and from many National Wildlife Refuges. Proceeds from the sale of this collectable stamp support conservation education and provide awards and scholarships for participating students, teachers and schools.

For additional information or if you have questions regarding participation in the Junior Duck Stamp program, please contact Pam Johnson at 541-867-4550 or by email at pam_johnson@fws.gov. Entries and reference forms must be postmarked by March 15, 2011 and mailed to:
Pam Johnson
Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex
2127 SE Marine Science Dr.
Newport, OR 97365
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 3:57 PM
November 5, 2010
Planning Process Initiated for Three Oregon Coast NWRs
The Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex has initiated a planning process called "Comprehensive Conservation Planning" to review the wildlife, habitat and public use activities on Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs). Three public Open House meetings will be held in communities along the Oregon coast to explain this process and to seek input from the public, interested government agencies, elected officials, Tribes, and conservation organizations regarding their interests, concerns, and viewpoints about important management issues on these refuges. Public input will be used to help determine the issues that will be addressed in the plan.

The public is invited to the following open house meetings:

-Monday , November 29 2010, 6-9 PM at the Lincoln City Community Center, 2150 NE Oar Place, Lincoln City, OR 97367
-Tuesday, November 30, 2010, 6-9 PM at the Kiwanda Community Center, 34600 Cape Kiwanda Drive, Pacific City, OR 97135
-Thursday, December 2, 2010, 6-9 PM at the Bandon Community Center, 1200 11th Street SW, Bandon, OR 97411

Please share your ideas by attending one of the upcoming public open house meetings and/or by submitting written comments. Comments on the issues to be addressed in the CCP should be mailed, faxed, or e-mailed by December 31, 2010, to Roy Lowe, Project Leader, Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 2127 SE Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR 97365; fax number (541)867-4551; or e-mail Oregoncoastccp@fws.gov.

During each meeting there will be a brief presentation at approximately 6:15 followed by the opportunity to talk to refuge staff about wildlife-oriented recreation, wildlife and habitat management, and the planning process. For more information please call the refuge’s Newport office at 541-867-4550, or go to www.fws.gov/oregoncoast/.

A Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) is a 15-year plan that guides a NWR’s management decisions, and identifies long-range refuge goals, objectives, and strategies for achieving the purposes for which the refuge was established. During the CCP planning process, many elements will be considered, including wildlife and habitat protection and management, and public use opportunities. More information about the CCP process is available at www.fws.gov/pacific/planning/.

Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is located in the lower Coquille River estuary on Oregon’s south coast. This 889-acre Refuge was established in 1983 to conserve the last substantial tract of salt marsh in the Coquille River estuary for migratory birds and for anadromous fish such as the threatened coho salmon. This Refuge’s habitats are a diversity of salt marsh, mudflats and tidal sloughs; forested freshwater wetlands; freshwater marsh; riparian areas; and grasslands. The eastern Ni-les’tun Unit includes 400 acres of historic saltmarsh that is in the process of being restored to tidal action, and visitors are able to observe wildlife from the viewing deck overlooking the restoration site. The western Bandon Marsh Unit consists primarily of salt marsh, mudflats, and riparian forest, and popular recreational activities on this Unit include waterfowl hunting, clamming, environmental education, and observing and photographing wildlife.

The 888-acre Nestucca Bay NWR is located on the north-central Oregon coast near the confluence of the Nestucca and Little Nestucca Rivers. This Refuge was established in 1991 to protect diverse coastal wetland habitats and upland habitat buffers for a variety of migratory waterfowl, shorebirds, raptors, songbirds, anadromous fish, and other wildlife, and to protect essential wintering habitat for Aleutian cackling geese, which were federally listed as endangered in 1967 and delisted in 2001, and for dusky Canada geese (USFWS species of concern). This Refuge contains open water, mudflats, and tidal marshes; grasslands; and lowland pastures which are managed intensively to provide goose habitat, especially for dusky Canada geese which continues to experience a long-term population decline. In 2002, the Refuge was expanded to include the Neskowin Marsh Unit which incorporates unique freshwater wetland and bog habitats not found within the original Refuge boundary. Habitats within the Neskowin Marsh Unit include marsh, bogs, forested wetlands, and upland shrub and meadows. Nestucca Bay NWR is also a place where people can enjoy nature. The Pacific View Trail and Overlook provide an accessible opportunity to observe wildlife and habitats from atop Cannery Hill at the Nestucca Bay Unit.

Siletz Bay NWR, also on the north-central coast but just south of Lincoln City, was established in 1991 to protect the remaining coastal wetlands and uplands around Siletz Bay from rapidly encroaching development. Tidal marsh protection and restoration were priority goals for establishing this Refuge. Siletz Bay NWR’s 568 acres of tidal marsh, diked former tidal marsh in varying stages of muted tidal action, forested wetlands, and upland forest provide essential habitat for shorebirds, wading birds, waterfowl, anadromous fish, and other estuarine-dependent fish and wildlife species. The Refuge offers seasonal opportunities to observe wildlife via guided canoe/kayak excursions on Millport Slough and the Siletz River which flow through the Refuge.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 9:55 AM
January 26, 2010
Brown Pelicans Dying on the Oregon Coast
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has been receiving calls about Brown Pelicans that are either washing up dead on the coast or are exhibiting behavior which is uncharacteristic for the species (i.e. begging for food, no fear of humans, eating bread crumbs as handouts). Many of the birds are emaciated, or starving and this is the reason for their seemingly lack of fear of humans.

California Brown Pelicans are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Thus it is against the law to capture, kill, or possess these birds. Anyone found in violation of this law could face penalties of up to $15,000 in fines and/or 6 months imprisonment for each violation. If you have information of anyone violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act please fill in the violation report form at: http://www.fws.gov/pacific/lawenforcement/reportviolations.html or call your local U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent at: (503) 682-6131

If you come upon a Brown Pelican that is still alive but appears to be starving here is what to do:

• If the bird is in the area of the coast from Astoria to Yachats please call the Wildlife Center of the North Coast at (503) 338-3954. Visit their Web site at www.coastwildlife.org/Home.html
• If the bird is in the area of the coast from Florence south to Gold Beach please call Free Flight Bird Rehabilitation at (541) 347-3882. Visit their Web site is www.freeflightwildlife.org
• If you find a dead Brown Pelican please leave it where you found it. Under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act it is illegal to possess any part of a migratory bird, dead or alive. If you find a dead pelican please contact the Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team at (206) 221-6893 or visit their Web site at: http://depts.washington.edu/coasst/
• Finally, please DO NOT feed these birds. This will only lead to further habituation of these birds to handouts from humans. It is important that these birds continue on their migratory route.

After the breeding season in California and Mexico, California Brown Pelicans migrate north throughout California, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia in the summer months and usually begin to head back south in large numbers in October. This year, however, a large number of pelicans remained along the Oregon coast through the winter. Recent storms and high winds have limited the pelicans ability to hunt and dive for food. These and other unknown factors contribute to the pelicans’ behavior to beg for food. We discourage hand feeding pelicans as their diet is very particular. Good intentions of feeding pelicans the bones and heads of fish can cause damage to the pelicans’ throat pouch. Also fish bait can be contaminated with harmful bacteria or may be treated with chemicals to promote better fishing or preserve the bait, but it can make a pelican very ill.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 12:00 AM
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Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 2127 SE Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR, 97365
Phone: 541-867-4550. Email: Oregoncoast@fws.gov.
 
Site last updated March 8, 2011